global burden of disease


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glo·bal burden of disease

statistical measure indicating loss of years of healthy life through disabling disease in a specified population, as measured in DALYs (q.v.).
See also: disability-adjusted life years.

glo·bal bur·den of dis·ease

(glō'băl bŭr'dĕn di-zēz')
Mathematical measure of loss of healthy life years due to disabling diseases in a country's population.
See also: disability-adjusted life years
References in periodicals archive ?
The results from two separate studies, 'Global, regional, and national levels of neonatal, infant, and under-5 mortality during 1990-2013: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013' and 'Global, regional, and national levels and causes of maternal mortality during 1990-2013: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013' has been published in The Lancet.
Priorities and targets currently under discussion for the post-2015 health agenda do not reflect the most rational use of the evidence presented in the 2010 Global Burden of Disease study, which shows that non-communicable diseases accounted for two of every three deaths globally in 2010 and are projected to be the most common cause of death in Africa by 2013.
In addition, they discuss the effects of parent psychopathology on offspring mental disorders; the similarities, differences, and complementarity of the data with the 2010 Global Burden of Disease study; and implications for mental health research, practice, and policy.
MORE people die or fall ill as a result of substance abuse and mental disorders than from HIV, tuberculosis and diabetes, according to the 2010 Global Burden of Disease Study, the biggest ever study of public health.
In the version of the WHO's Global Burden of Disease report we utilized, the terminal age category has been extended from the previous 85+ to 100+, which allows for better adjustment for differences in the proportion of population in older strata.
Data was drawn from the Global Burden of Disease Study, published in 2010.
However, the Global Burden of Disease findings actually show that this increase is not as large as one would expect given the increasing life expectancy in the world's population over this time.
The authors used the same methodology as that employed in the Global Burden of Disease Study 2010 (Lancet 2012:380;2055-2058).
The study of the burden of disease on a truly global scale began with the World Health Organization's (WHO's) Global Burden of Disease Study (Murray and Lopez 1996).
Currently depression is ranked fourth among the 10 leading causes of the Global Burden of Disease, a comprehensive regional and global assessment of mortality and disability from 107 diseases and injuries.
In fact, in the last comparative risk assessment conducted by the World Health Organization (WHO), the detrimental impact of alcohol consumption on the global burden of disease and injury was surpassed only by unsafe sex and childhood underweight status but exceeded that of many classic risk factors, such as unsafe water and sanitation, hypertension, high cholesterol, or tobacco use (WHO 2009).
Until recently the impact of surgical interventions on the global burden of disease had not been estimated.

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