global aphasia


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to global aphasia: anomic aphasia, conduction aphasia, Broca's aphasia

aphasia

 [ah-fa´zhah]
a type of speech disorder consisting of a defect or loss of the power of expression by speech, writing, or signs, or of comprehension of spoken or written language, due to disease or injury of the brain centers, such as after stroke syndrome on the left side.
Patient Care. Aphasia is a complex phenomenon manifested in numerous ways. The recovery period is often very long, even months or years. Because communication is such a vital part of everyday living, loss of the ability to communicate with words, whether in speaking or writing, can profoundly affect the personality and behavior of a patient. Although aphasic persons usually require extensive treatment by specially trained speech patholigists or therapists, all persons concerned with the care of the patient should practice techniques that will help minimize frustration and improve communication with such patients.
amnestic aphasia anomic aphasia.
anomic aphasia inability to name objects, qualities, or conditions. Called also amnestic or nominal aphasia.
ataxic aphasia expressive aphasia.
auditory aphasia loss of ability to comprehend spoken language. Called also word deafness.
Broca's aphasia motor aphasia.
conduction aphasia aphasia due to a lesion of the pathway between the sensory and motor speech centers.
expressive aphasia motor aphasia.
fluent aphasia that in which speech is well articulated (usually 200 or more words per minute) and grammatically correct but is lacking in content and meaning.
global aphasia total aphasia involving all the functions that go to make up speech and communication.
jargon aphasia that with utterance of meaningless phrases, either neologisms or incoherently arranged known words.
mixed aphasia combined expressive and receptive aphasia.
motor aphasia aphasia in which there is impairment of the ability to speak and write, owing to a lesion in the insula and surrounding operculum including Broca's motor speech area. The patient understands written and spoken words but has difficulty uttering the words. See also receptive aphasia. Called also logaphasia and Broca's, expressive, or nonfluent aphasia.
nominal aphasia anomic aphasia.
nonfluent aphasia motor aphasia.
receptive aphasia inability to understand written, spoken, or tactile speech symbols, due to disease of the auditory and visual word centers, as in word blindness. See also motor aphasia. Called also logamnesia and sensory or Wernicke's aphasia.
sensory aphasia receptive aphasia.
visual aphasia alexia.
Wernicke's aphasia receptive aphasia.

glo·bal a·pha·si·a

in which all aspects of speech and communication are severely impaired. At best, patients can understand or speak only a few words or phrases; they can neither read nor write.

global aphasia

[glō′bəl]
Etymology: L, globus, ball; Gk, a + phasis, without speech
a loss of ability to use or comprehend any form of written or spoken language. The condition involves both sensory and motor nerve tracts and is a relatively more severe form of aphasia. Communication is attempted through gestures or the use of automatic words and phrases. Also called mixed aphasia.

global aphasia

Total aphasia, see there.

glo·bal a·pha·si·a

(glō'băl ă-fā'zē-ă)
Disorder in which all aspects of speech and communication are severely impaired. At best, patients can understand or speak only a few words or phrases; they can neither read nor write.
Synonym(s): mixed aphasia, total aphasia.

Global aphasia

A condition characterized by either partial or total loss of the ability to communicate verbally or using written words as a result of widespread injury to the language areas of the brain. This condition may be caused by a stroke, head injury, brain tumor, or infection. The exact language abilities affected vary depending on the location and extent of injury.
Mentioned in: Aphasia
References in periodicals archive ?
Numerous therapies were enlisted as the tumor and neurological deficits progressed to her current state of a moderate global aphasia, a right field cut, and a mild right pronator drift.
Written by a daughter after months of watching her father caring for her mother Second Place "Overcoming Global Aphasia," by Joanne Koontz-Leopold, Gainesville, Fla.
Here, we present the case of a patient with forgetfulness and global aphasia whose MRI was normal three months before presentation and who turned to have GBM.

Full browser ?