gliosis


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gliosis

 [gli-o´sis]
an excess of astroglia in damaged areas of the central nervous system.

gli·o·sis

(glī-ō'sis),
Overgrowth of the astrocytes in an area of damage in the brain or spinal cord.

gliosis

/gli·o·sis/ (gli-o´sis) an excess of astroglia in damaged areas of the central nervous system.

gliosis

[glī·ō′sis]
a proliferation of astrocytes that may appear as a sign of healing after a central nervous system injury. See also fibrogliosis.

gliosis

Astrocytosis, astrogliosis Neuropathology An abnormal ↑ in astrocytes 2º to destruction of nearby neurons, typically due to ↓ glucose or O2

gli·o·sis

(glī-ō'sis)
Overgrowth of the astrocytes in an area of damage in the brain or spinal cord.

gliosis

Propagation (proliferation) of nerve connective tissue (neuroglia) in the brain or spinal cord. This may occur as a repair process or as a response to inflammation.

gliosis

an excess of astroglia in damaged areas of the central nervous system.
References in periodicals archive ?
The gliosis may be the aftermath of such an autoimmune attack, says Siegel.
Gliosis is a proliferation of astrocytes in the CNS in response to injury which results in scar formation.
In addition to evaluating regional neuronal loss and gliosis, microvascular lesions, vascular brain injury, and hippocampal sclerosis, the dementia brain should always be investigated for AD and LBD pathology, regardless of the specific clinical diagnosis.
Histologic examination of the brain revealed microspongiosis, edema, gliosis, and neuronal chromatolysis of surrounding periventricular tissue.
Axial FLAIR of the brain at 6-month follow-up (E) reveals almost complete resolution of the right basal ganglia lesion with some residual gliosis primarily involving the caudate head.
2] Diffuse cerebral cortical atrophy may be symmetric or asymmetric, resulting from neuronal death and gliosis, induced by the accumulation of GAGs.
Continuance of chorea despite normalization of blood glucose in some patients and the fact that abnormal movements are generally observed on the one side of the body are contradictory to a metabolic pathology, while the fact that chorea may be observed bilaterally and observation of only neuron loss, gliosis and reactive astrocytosis, but not infarction or hemorrhagia are contradictory to vascular pathology (9,10).
chronic stage: gliosis of the optic nerve head and eventually optic atrophy with nerve fibre damage and permanent visual field defect.
It is characterised by an autoimmune process involving autoreactive B- and T-cells that results in demyelination, axonal loss and resultant gliosis.
The changes in the optic nerve head demonstrate that reactive gliosis and microglial activation have occurred; however, these differences do not account for the differential effects of glaucoma in the D2 mouse relative to the B6 mouse.
The brain tissue of infected individuals will often show a reactive gliosis in the absence of an inflammatory response, and protease-resistant PrP deposits are often easily detected.