glial cell


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glial cell

n.
Any of the cells making up the neuroglia, especially the astrocytes, oligodendroglia, and microglia.

glial cell

One of three types of nonneuronal cell in the central nervous system: astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, and microglial cells. SYN neuroglial cell
Synonym: neuroglial cell
See also: cell
References in periodicals archive ?
Control inflammation that can harm glial cells by treating infections such as gum disease promptly.
In order to test the ability of these stem cell-derived glial cells to make myelin in a damaged nervous system, the investigators implanted these cells into the spinal cords of a specific strain of rat--one that does not make normal myelin due to a genetic mutation.
Walczak and Bulte (Director, CIS ICE) on this important project to study the efficacy of glial cells derived from these several sources, broadening use of Q-Cells for treatment of demyelinating diseases.
We now report that the cell membrane permeable fluorogenic substrate calcein acetoxymethyl (AM) ester, which is converted to an impermeable and fluorescent derivative by esterases, differentially labels the adaxonal glial cells and other structures in the glial sheath surrounding the squid giant axon (GA) and the crayfish medial giant axon (MGA).
Brain cell roll call: three types of glial cells and a neuron
The discovery stems from a collaboration between the laboratories of radial glial cell scientist Arnold Kriegstein director of the Broad Center of Regeneration Medicine and Stem Cell Research, and Michael Oldham of UCSF.
The protein, known as glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), is injected once a month through a port just behind the ear and pushed through the tubes and catheters by an external pump.
The differentiated cells were previously shown to produce a unique protein required for brain cell survival and growth, glial cell line derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF).
prenatally in the rat), whereas gliogenesis and glial cell differentiation continue well into postnatal development (Aschner et al.