gliadin

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gliadin

 [gli´ah-din]
a protein in wheat that contains the toxic factor associated with celiac disease.

gli·a·din

(glī'ă-din),
A class of protein, separable from wheat and rye glutens; a member of the prolamins (proline-rich proteins), which are insoluble in water, absolute alcohol, and neutral solvents, but soluble in 50-90% alcohol.

gliadin

/gli·a·din/ (-din) a protein present in wheat; it contains the toxic factor associated with celiac disease.

gliadin

(glī′ə-dĭn)
n.
Any of several prolamin proteins present in wheat grains, and constituting a component of wheat gluten. Gliadins can cause celiac disease in susceptible individuals by inducing a destructive immune response in the small intestine.

gliadin

[glī′ədin]
Etymology: Gk, glia, glue
a fraction of the gluten protein that is found in wheat and rye and to a lesser extent in barley and oats. Its solubility in diluted alcohol distinguishes it from another grain protein, glutenin. Those with celiac disease are sensitive to this substance, and it is excluded from their diet. See also celiac disease.

gli·a·din

(glī'ă-din)
A class of protein, separable from wheat and rye glutens, which contains up to 40% l-glutamine; a member of the prolamins, which are insoluble in water, absolute alcohol, and neutral solvents, but soluble in 50-90% alcohol.

gliadin

One of the two main components of wheat protein and the one that contains the factor responsible for damaging the intestinal lining and causing COELIAC DISEASE.

gliadin (glī´ədin),

n a protein substance that is obtained from wheat and rye. Its solubility in diluted alcohol distinguishes gliadin from glutenin.