glia


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glia

 [gli´ah]
neuroglia; the supporting structure of nervous tissue, consisting, in the central nervous system, of astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, and microglia.

neu·rog·li·a

(nū-rog'lē-ă), This word is grammatically singular. Avoid the mispronunciation neurogli'a.
Nonneuronal cellular elements of the central and peripheral nervous system; formerly believed to be merely supporting cells but now thought to have important metabolic functions, in that they are invariably interposed between neurons and the blood vessels supplying the nervous system. In central nervous tissue they include oligodendroglia cells, astrocytes, ependymal cells, and microglia cells. The satellite cells of ganglia and the neurolemmal or Schwann cells around peripheral nerve fibers can be interpreted as the oligodendroglia cells of the peripheral nervous system.
Synonym(s): reticulum (2) [TA], glia, Kölliker reticulum
[neuro- + G. glia, glue]

glia

(gli´ah) neuroglia.

glia

(glē′ə, glī′ə)
n.

gli′al (glē′əl, glī′əl) adj.

glia

See neuroglia.

neu·rog·li·a

(nūr-og'lē-ă) [TA]
Nonneuronal cellular elements of the central and peripheral nervous system; thought to have important metabolic functions. In central nervous tissue they include oligodendroglia cells, astrocytes, ependymal cells, and microglia cells.
Synonym(s): glia, reticulum (2) .
[G. neuron, tendon, nerve, + glia, glue]

glia

or

neuroglia

the web of undifferentiated cells that packs and supports nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord.

glia

neuroglia; the supporting cells of the central nervous system, made up of astrocytes, oligodendrocytes and microglia.
References in periodicals archive ?
Barres said other as yet unidentified signals from glia are necessary to form fully functional synapses.
The two genes, hspd1 and mps1, had been found in other studies to be required for fin and heart regeneration in zebrafish, and Qin's work showed that they also were switched on in Muller glia from damaged zebrafish retinas.
Selectively expanding the progenitor pool by Fgf10 regulation of the timing of radial glia differentiation could account for the selective expansion of the frontal cortex, which has been greatly expanded in humans and is thought to be important for evolving what are considered typically human traits," says O'Leary.
Although the PN11-14 treatment window is outside the span of neurogenesis in most of the regions affected (notably excepting the cerebellum), the critical involvement of glia in neuronal integrity, axonogenesis, and synaptogenesis could account for abnormalities including neuronal markers such as NF68 and NF200.
In subsequent experiments, researchers added these glia back into the mix and found that synaptic activity increased 70-fold.
With the help of new mass spectrometry technique and stem cells that can be made to produce either neurons or glia, the researchers led by Federico Herrera, Ph.
Although we had previously postulated preferential targeting of glia (18), there were potential confounds in our comparing cultures with different combinations of sera in the medium, and the current results indicate that the greater sensitivity of C6 cells is present even in the absence of serum proteins.
In the 1960s, neuroscientists established that glia nurture and defend neurons, but now scientists are finding that glia also rein in neurons' impulses, issue them orders, and shape their future moves.
To show that glial cells weren't solely responsible for the axon's slow regeneration, Goldberg removed the glia from axons in the optic nerves of embryonic and 8-day-old rats.
Writing about their findings in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the researchers revealed that they studied a particular retinal cell called the Muller glia.
This update of the 1996 edition incorporates a new understanding of glia cells--the "Rodney Dangerfield cells" of the central nervous system--as extending beyond a support role for neurons, and extends its intended audience to include researchers in multidisciplinary fields relevant to neurotoxicology.
Furthermore, Siegel and his colleagues documented evidence of gliosis, a proliferation of brain cells called glia, at the site of cell loss.