glenohumeral ligaments


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Related to glenohumeral ligaments: Transverse humeral ligament, Coracohumeral ligament, costoclavicular ligament, Radial collateral ligament

gle·no·hu·mer·al lig·a·ments

[TA]
three fibrous bands (capsular ligaments) that reinforce the anterior part of the articular capsule of the shoulder joint; they are in continuity with the glenoid labrum at the supraglenoid tubercle of the scapula and blend with the fibrous capsule as it attaches to the anatomic neck of the humerus; they are conspicuous as folds or ridges on the internal aspect of the articular capsule.
Synonym(s): ligamenta glenohumeralia [TA]

glenohumeral ligaments

Etymology: Gk, glene, joint socket, humerus, shoulder
three thickened bands of connective tissue attached proximally to the anterior margin of the glenoid cavity and distally to the neck of the humerus.
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Glenohumeral ligaments

gle·no·hu·mer·al lig·a·ments

(glē'nō-hyū'mĕr-ăl lig'ă-mĕnts) [TA]
Three fibrous bands that reinforce the anterior part of the articular capsule of the shoulder joint; they are in continuity with the glenoid labrum at the supraglenoid tubercle of the scapula and blend with the fibrous capsule as it attaches to the anatomic neck of the humerus.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ennis M, Taylor JG and Atkinson R (1995): Neural anatomy of the glenohumeral ligaments, labrum, and subacromial bursa.
External rotation greater than 90[degrees] at the side is suggestive of anterior ligamentous hyperlaxity; asymmetrical hyperabduction of more than 20[degrees] compared to the contralateral arm is indicative of a stretched inferior glenohumeral ligament.
Anatomy and function of the glenohumeral ligaments in anterior shoulder instability.
The contribution of the glenohumeral ligaments to anterior stability of the shoulder.
16) As stated previously, the sublabral foramen is considered a normal anatomic variant and the shoulder joint functions appropriately in the presence of such a defect given that the glenohumeral ligaments and rotator cuff muscles are intact.
Normally, external rotation of the humerus creates tension in the glenohumeral ligaments, especially the inferior glenohumeral ligament.
Bencardino and colleagues (24) found that SLAP lesions were associated with partial rotator cuff tears in 42% of patients, frayed or lax inferior glenohumeral ligaments in 26%, Bankart lesions in 16%, Hill-Sachs lesions in 16%, chondral lesions in 16%, loose bodies in 10%, complete rotator cuff tears in 5%, and posterior labral tears in 5%.