glenohumeral


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Related to glenohumeral: radioulnar, humeroulnar

gle·no·hu·mer·al

(glē'nō-hyū'mĕr-ăl),
Relating to the glenoid cavity and the humerus.

glenohumeral

/gle·no·hu·mer·al/ (gle″no-hu´mer-al) pertaining to the glenoid cavity and the humerus.

glenohumeral

[glē′nōhyo̅o̅′mərəl]
Etymology: Gk, glene, joint socket; L, humerus, shoulder
pertaining to the glenoid cavity and the humerus at the shoulder joint.

gle·no·hu·mer·al

(glē'nō-hyū'mĕr-ăl)
Relating to the glenoid cavity and the humerus.
References in periodicals archive ?
sup][1] Under these circumstances, it would be logical to suppose that the SSB is an outpouching portion of the glenohumeral joint and could be regarded as the SSR.
Increased shoulder flexibility and ROM are beneficial to all strokes but can result in increased laxity of the glenohumeral joint capsule and ligaments, the static stabilizers of the shoulder.
Shoulder mobilizations included long-axis distraction and lateral gapping of the glenohumeral joint, in addition to the "shoulder shake"--inferior distraction and oscillation while moving from neutral to 90 degrees abduction in the frontal plane.
The supraspinatus peaks in activity at approximately 30 to 60[degrees] of glenohumeral abduction due to a pattern of decreasing mechanical advantage of the muscle that accompanies an increase in the abduction angle of the arm (29).
Mechanism of shoulder movements and a plea for the recognition of zero position of glenohumeral joint.
He described an episode that occurred four years earlier in which he was hospitalized for suspected glenohumeral joint infection.
Measurement of glenohumeral internal rotation in asymptomatic tennis players and swimmers.
The glenohumeral (GH) joint consists of the humeral head that articulates in the glenoid fossa of the scapula, surrounded by several static and dynamic structures.
For this reason, arthrofascial stretching (Grade IV joint mobilization) of the glenohumeral joint and the thoracic and cervical spinal joints is a necessary component of care and should also be done to address the intrinsic fascial tissue of the joints.
In recent literature, SIS has been described as a group of symptoms rather than a specific diagnosis5 and the causative factors are identified as trauma, daily wear and tear, repetitive use, age-related degeneration, RC dysfunction, scapular muscle weakness and dysfunction, imbalance between the concentrically activated agonist and eccentrically activated antagonist, posterior capsular tightness (PCT ),6,7 glenohumeral instability, postural abnormalities and scapular dyskinesis.