glaze


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glaze

(glāz) in dentistry, a ceramic veneer added to a porcelain restoration, to simulate enamel.

glaze

[glāz]
Etymology: ME, glasen
1 v, to cover with a glossy, smooth surface or coating.
2 n, a ceramic veneer added to a dental porcelain restoration after it has been fired, to give a completely nonporous, glossy, or semiglossy surface.
3 n, the final firing (in air) of dental porcelain, when formation of a thin, vitreous, glossy surface takes place.

glaze,

n a critical stage in the final firing of dental porcelain when complete fusion takes place, with the formation of a thin, vitreous, glossy surface, or glaze.
References in periodicals archive ?
The good news is that about a decade ago, the ceramic industry began developing encapsulated reds that allow glaze manufacturers to create new safer red glazes.
In 1980 he started Ceramics Consulting Services, a ceramics consulting firm developing clay body and glaze formulas for ceramics supply companies throughout the US.
They mainly consist of applying a coloured glaze over a base coat of lighter or contrasting colour and, best of all, most effects can be achieved with limited tools and materials.
The classic sign is a distorted outside wall and a foamy-looking glaze that is sometimes greenish in color [ILLUSTRATION FOR FIGURE 1 OMITTED].
The glazes tend to remain within the quiet gray/white/brown/black range, with a deep-porcelain blue the only emphatic chromatic element.
Sponging involves dipping a damp sponge into the paint tray holding the glaze, dabbing it off to remove excess liquid on to newspaper and then dabbing the colour on to the base-coated surface.
Targeted at the meat and butchery markets, and at the catering and food service sectors, the high quality glazes will bring added value to a wide range of meat and poultry products.
Key elements in a successful wall-glazing project are understanding how to apply the glaze and knowing what colors will combine to create an attractive finish.
While there is a certain personal and informal quality to such an approach, it can lead to numerous inaccuracies in exchanging or understanding glaze formulas.
Each frit-based glaze will give a different structure and density of crystals, as well as different tones to the colorants (mostly the metals' carbonates).
These factors can have an effect on the color and the surface of a glaze.
While black-glazed wares were made in China from a much earlier period, the type of glaze you can see on this pot is typical of Jian wares of northern Fujian province; although it has deteriorated in places through burial, you can still see how beautiful it is.