fiberglass

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fiberglass

, fiber glass (fi'ber-glas?)
Material made from fine fibers of glass and having many industrial uses, e.g., as insulation. The fibers are irritating and potentially damaging to the skin and lungs. Fiberglass is used in health care in the construction of orthopedic casts and splints.
Synonym: fibrous glass
References in periodicals archive ?
15 below, but its effect is less pronounced than in the glass fiber reinforced molding.
Final Composite Plates Of Glass, Palm And Glass (Without Chemical Treatment) Palm And Glass Fiber (With Chemical Treatment):
The significant increase in carrying capacity of walls that were strengthened with horizontal glass fiber straps (5/1, 5/2, 5/3) compared to unreinforced walls (1/1, 1/2, 1/3) is apparent (6.
Glass Fibers (published 05/2003, 293 pages) is available for $3,900 from The Freedonia Group, Inc.
of France in September to produce continuous glass fibers.
If you took a [commercial] glass fiber and produced the same number of microscopic cracks in it, the transmission would [also] be absolutely horrible," she notes.
The tank consists of a rectangular concrete structure 18 inches thick surrounding an egg-shape glass fiber shell reinforced with ribs of the same material.
com/research/vltr62/global_and) has announced the addition of the "Global and Chinese Glass Fiber Industry Report, 2012-2015" report to their offering.
Sandeep Vennam, PPG senior project R&D engineer, will present on Performance Drivers on Fatigue Properties of Glass Fiber Composites.
Johns Manville, a market-leading manufacturer of glass fiber products, announced the expansion of its glass fiber operations plant in Etowah, TN, to service the increasing needs of the engineered thermoplastics industry is underway and will be finished this year.
A category of material which has received renewed interest, especially from car manufacturers, is natural fiber-reinforced polypropylene (PP) to substitute for traditional glass fiber materials for non-structural injection molding applications.
The present study has focused the development of radar absorbing structures by embedding different carbon-based fillers like carbon black, short carbon fibers, and carbon nanotubes into the glass fiber reinforced epoxy resin as a matrix material using vacuum assisted resin infusion technique.