sweat glands

(redirected from glandulae sudoriferae)
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sweat glands

[TA]
the coiled glands of the skin that secrete sweat so as to enable evaporative cooling in a hot environment, or in response to emotion.

sweat glands

(swet glandz) [TA]
The coiled glands of the skin that secrete the sweat.

sweat glands

Tiny, coiled tubular glands deep in the skin that open either directly on to the surface or into hair follicles and secrete a salty liquid. Apocrine glands occur only on hairy areas and open into hair follicles. Apocrine sweat contains organic matter that can be decomposed by skin bacteria and cause odours. Eccrine glands open on the surface, especially of the palms of the hands and the soles of the feet.

Boerhaave,

Hermann, Dutch physician, 1668-1738.
Boerhaave glands - Synonym(s): sweat glands
Boerhaave syndrome - spontaneous rupture of the lower esophagus, a variant of Mallory-Weiss syndrome.

sweat glands

eccrine glands investing all skin areas; secrete sweat in response to hypothalamic reaction to skin, core body and environmental temperatures; under autonomic control; see perspiration

sweat

the excretion of the sweat (sudoriparous) glands of the skin; perspiration. Sweating produces an evaporative cooling of the body, the importance varying between species, and also serves an excretory function. Substances eliminated in sweat include water, sodium chloride and small amounts of urea, lactic acid and potassium ions. In humans the ability to lose heat by sweating is much greater than that in domestic animals. Cattle have a high sweat rate (150 g/m2/h at 40°C), sheep lose less (32 g/m2/h) and dogs lose an insignificant amount. Horses probably have the highest sweat rate of all.
Excessive sweating is called diaphoresis, hyperhidrosis.

atrichial sweat gland
see sweat glands (below).
eccrine sweat gland
called also atrichial sweat gland; see sweat glands (below).
sweat fly
Morrelia aenescens, M. hortorum, M. simplex.
sweat glands
the glands that secrete sweat, situated in the corium or subcutaneous tissue, and opening by a duct on the surface of the body. They are of two types: (1) the ordinary or eccrine sweat glands are unbranched, coiled, tubular glands that promote cooling by evaporation of their secretion. They are innervated by cholinergic nerve fibers; (2) the apocrine sweat glands are large, branched, specialized glands that empty into the upper portion of a hair follicle instead of directly onto the skin surface, and have no secretory innervation but are sensitive to epinephrine in the bloodstream. Called also sudoriferous, or sudoriparous, glands.
paratrichial sweat gland
see apocrine sweat gland.
sweat scraper
a semicircular band of metal with a handle to be dragged over a horse's skin like a squeegee to remove excess moisture quickly.