glabrous

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glabrous

 [gla´brus]
smooth and bare.

gla·brous

, glabrate (glā'brŭs, glā'brāt),
Smooth or hairless; denoting areas of the body where hair does not normally grow, that is, palms or soles.
[L. glaber, smooth]

glabrous

/gla·brous/ (gla´brus) smooth and bare.

glabrous

(glā′brəs)
adj.
Having no hairs or pubescence; smooth: glabrous leaves.

gla′brous·ness n.

gla·brous

, glabrate (glā'brŭs, -brāt)
Smooth or hairless; denoting areas of the body where hair does not normally grow, i.e., palms or soles.
[L. glaber, smooth]

glabrous

Smooth. The term is applied to a hairless surface.

glabrous

(of plant structures) without hairs.

glabrous

palmar and plantar skin characterized by lack of hair, hair follicles and sebaceous glands

glabrous

smooth and bare.
References in periodicals archive ?
If a conceivable upside of cultivated glabrousness is its capacity to signify bodily emancipation, to announce an individual's freedom from the shackles of social illegitimacy, then perhaps its concurrent capacity to reflect a certain disempowered complacency is a downside that brings us full circle.
The retreat into cultivated glabrousness, then, becomes a matter of ritually disciplining a bodily demeanour, thus finding depilatory and epilatory practices denoting "the stylised conduct of the individual within the contexts of everyday life, involving the use of appearance to create specific impressions of self" (Giddens 242).
It can be said, here, that practices geared around the cultivation of glabrousness are also organized around notions of control and self-affirmation.
Thus, what we detect is cultivated glabrousness as a bodily regime that stands in to compensate the individual for this conceivable distance between an ethical collective responsibility and a sense of being ill-equipped to practise this ideal in a material reality.