ginseng


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to ginseng: American ginseng

gin·seng

(jin'seng),
The roots of several species of Panax (family Araliaceae), esteemed as of great medicinal virtue by the Chinese, used extensively as a "nutriceutical"; alleged to improve mental and physical functions.
[Ch.]

ginseng

/gin·seng/ (jin´seng)
1. any herb of the genus Panax>, especially P. ginseng (Chinese g.) and P. quinquefolius (American g.).
2. the root of Chinese or American ginseng, used as a tonic and stimulant.

eleuthero ginseng , Siberian ginseng the shrub Eleutherococcus senticosus, or a preparation of its root, which is used to improve general well-being and for various indications in traditional Chinese medicine.

ginseng

(jĭn′sĕng′)
n.
1. Any of several plants of the genus Panax, especially P. ginseng of East Asia or P. quinquefolius of North America, having small greenish flowers grouped in umbels, palmately compound leaves, and forked roots used in herbal medicine.
2. The roots or preparations of the roots of any of these plants.

ginseng

an herb with red or yellow fruits that is native to the Far East and is now found throughout the world. One species is native to North America.
uses It is used for physical and mental exhaustion, stress, viral infections, diabetes, sluggishness, fatigue, weak immunity, and convalescence and may have some efficacy (e.g., better stress tolerance, reaction times, abstract thinking).
contraindications It should not be used during pregnancy and lactation or in children. It is also contraindicated in those with known hypersensitivity, hypertension, and cardiac disorders.
Alternative medicine An herb used as a herbal remedy, as an anxiolytic and antidepressant
Chinese medicine Any of 22 different deciduous plants, mostly of the Panax family—e.g., Panax ginseng—that are native to Southeast Asia; ginseng root contains panaxin, panax acid, panaquilen, panacen, sapogenin, and ginsenin; it is used in Chinese herbal medicine as a tonic and restorative, and said to have immunologic, hormonal, and stress-reducing effects; it has been used for respiratory infections, gastrointestinal complaints including anorexia, bloating, depression, diarrhoea, vomiting, fatigue, impotence, shock, shortness of breath, stress, increased sweating
Physiologic effects Increased testosterone, corticosteroids, gluconeogenesis, central nervous system activity, increased pulse and blood pressure, gastrointestinal motility, haematopoiesis; decreased cholesterol
Toxicity Ginseng should not be used in patients with asthma, arrhythmias, hypertension, or post-menopausal bleeding
Fringe oncology Ginseng’s effect on cancer is inconclusive; weak data suggest it may have carcinoprotective effects. See Unproven methods for cancer management

ginseng

Pharmacognosy An herb used as a herbal remedy, as an anxiolytic and antidepressant Physiologic effects ↑ testosterone, corticosteroids, gluconeogenesis, CNS activity, HTN, ↑ pulse and BP, GI motility, hematopoiesis; ↓ cholesterol Toxicity Ginseng should not be used in Pts with asthma, arrhythmias, HTN, or post-menopausal bleeding. See Unproven methods for cancer management.

gin·seng

(jin'seng)
(Panax quinquefolius) Herbal with dozens of purported therapeutic properties (e.g., antidepressant, aphrodisiac, sleep aid, systemic panacea); used worldwide by enormous numbers of people.
[Ch.]

ginseng

The root of two perennial Chinese and Korean herbs of the genus Panax—P. quinquefolium or P. schinseng . Ginseng is credited with the power to cure many diseases including cancer, rheumatism and diabetes, and to have powerful aphrodisiac properties. There is no evidence that the herb has any medical or other value.

ginseng,

n Latin names:
Panax ginseng, Panax quinquefolius; part used: roots; uses: adaptogen, im-munostimulant, endurance, fatigue and stress, concentration, tonic, diabetes; occasionally used for hyper-lipidemia, cancer, rheumatism, male infertility and sexual dysfunction; precautions: high blood pressure, cardiac conditions; patients taking anticoagulants, insulin, MAOIs, antidiabetics, stimulants, or ephedra. Also called
American ginseng, Asian ginseng, Asiatic ginseng, Chinese ginseng, five-fingers, Japanese ginseng, jintsam, Korean ginseng, ninjin, Oriental ginseng, schinsent, seng and sang, tartar root, true ginseng, or
Western ginseng.
ginseng, American,
n.pr See gin-seng.
ginseng, Asian (āˑ·zhn jinˑ·sing),
n Latin name:
Panax ginseng; part used: roots; uses: general health, illness protection, antiinflammatory, muscle relaxant, tumor prevention, stimulant; precautions: pregnancy; can cause high blood pressure, diabetes, sleeplessness, diarrhea, painful breasts, mania, vaginal bleeding.
ginseng, eleuthero,
n See ginseng, Siberian.
ginseng, Siberian (sī·bēˑ·rē·n ginˑ·sing),
n.pr Latin names:
Acanthopanax senticosus, Eleutherococcus senticosus, Hedera senticosa; parts used: roots; uses: adaptogen, radio-stimulant, anticancer, immuno-stimulant, immunomodulator, genital herpes, athletic performance, energy, antiinflammatory, insomnia; precautions: pregnancy, lactation, children; do not use over three concurrent months; do not use with antidiabetic medications, immunosuppressive medications, cardiac glycosides, stimulants, ephedra. Also called
devil's shrub, Russian ginseng, shigoka, or
touch-me-not.
ginseng, true,
n See ginseng, Asian.

ginseng

a mixture of saponins from the dried root of Panax sp; reputed to have a wide range of pharmacologic properties. Used variously as a stimulant, a sedative and to increase stamina and resistance to disease. Called also Ren Shen in Chinese herbal medicine.
References in periodicals archive ?
Growing Ginseng started out as a trial for them in 2006 and they had their first commercial harvest in 2016.
Laboratory blood values were normal throughout the study except for 1 patient with diabetes in the 3000 mg/day Korean red ginseng group who had a rise in glucose, but it was not attributed to the treatment.
Ginseng has being distributed in almost 35 countries around the world, with difference amount and volume distributed in each country, not all country able to cultivate ginseng due to its growth characteristics.
2007) reported that the changes in ginsenoside content with age may also be related to the growing area of ginseng roots.
The Wisconsin form of ginseng is particularly attractive to consumers for the: (1) the distinct, bitter taste sought by many tea lovers, and (2) very high concentrations of ginsenosides--the active medicinal ingredients of ginseng.
Brogan (with whom I spoke by phone), most of the illegally harvested ginseng is taken from private lands without the permission of the owners--in other words, stolen.
Both the presence of ginseng and the thermal treatment affected some sensory properties of the milk.
The Panax ginseng were provided in freeze-dried granulated extracts weighing 4g each packed in paper medicine pockets with participants required to take one packet twice daily for 8 weeks.
It was Peter who told me about a red ginseng root extract he said could prevent the influenza A virus infection.
Evidence of ginseng as a medical herb can be found in Shen Nong's (a legendary emperor reported to have existed as far back as 2500 or 2700 B.
In this 8-week, double-blind RCT, Barton et al (1) randomized more than 300 patients from 40 US cancer facilities to receive either 1000 mg of American ginseng twice daily (in the morning and at noon) or matched placebo capsules.
Siberian ginseng is native to the Taiga region of the Far East (southeastern part of Russia, northern China, Korea and Japan).