ginkgolides

ginkgolides

Alternative pharmacology
A large group of medicinal preparations from a tree in northern China, Ginkgo biloba, which are used by herbalists for cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease, emotional lability, ocular defects, panic disorder, vertigo and other conditions.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ginkgo terpenoids consisting of two classes of compounds, ginkgolides and bilobalides (terpenic lactone and terpenic trilactone respectively), have been shown in several studies to minimise ischemia induced neurotoxicity and inhibit glutamate induced excitotoxicity (Chandrasekran 2002, Klein 1997, Prehen 1993).
However, ginkgolides has a cage skeleton consisting of six five-membered rings, therefore, are very tough to be synthesized and they have their specific mode of action against selected pathophysiological condition cause by PAF.
Terpenoids consist of ginkgolides and bilobalide that inhibit platelet activating factor (PAF) which in consequence reduce the blood viscosity (Ma et al.
Ginkgolides have been shown to potently antagonize the PAF receptor and thereby affect the signalling pathways involved.
Ginkgo leaf extract contains antioxidant compounds called ginkgolides and bilobalides which help scavenge free radicals that attack nearly all components of the cell, including DNA.
The products addressed range from ginkgolides and natural antibiotics to products used to treat cancer, malaria, HIV, and Alzheimer disease.
The primary active principles in ginkgo are flavone glycosides and the terpene lactones bilobalide and certain ginkgolides, particularly ginkgolide B.
Ginkgolides in the plant have antiplatelet effects.
The primary compounds of interest in ginkgo are ginkgolides and bilobalide.
Koji Nakanishi, centennial professor of chemistry at Columbia University, scientists generally agree that the most important beneficial ingredients in any ginkgo extract are terpene lactones, commonly known as ginkgolides, and flavonoid glycosides.
If you're measuring ginkgolides in ginkgo leaves, for example, you are going to want a ginkgo leaf CRM.
An in vitro study which confirmed antiplatelet activity used a dosage of ginkgolides 100 times the normal human serum level and does not account for human pharmacokinetic metabolism of the phytochemicals.