gingivostomatitis


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Related to gingivostomatitis: herpetic gingivostomatitis

gingivostomatitis

 [jin″jĭ-vo-sto″mah-ti´tis]
inflammation of the gingiva and oral mucosa.
herpetic gingivostomatitis that due to infection with herpes simplex virus, with redness of the oral tissues, formation of multiple vesicles and painful ulcers, and fever.
necrotizing ulcerative gingivostomatitis that due to extension to the oral mucosa of necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis; see also vincent's angina. Called also Plaut's or pseudomembranous angina.

gin·gi·vo·sto·ma·ti·tis

(jin'ji-vō-stō'mă-tī'tis),
Inflammation of the gingiva and other oral mucous membranes.
[gingivo- + G. stoma, mouth, + -itis, inflammation]

gingivostomatitis

/gin·gi·vo·sto·ma·ti·tis/ (jin″jĭ-vo-sto″mah-ti´tis) inflammation of the gingivae and oral mucosa.
herpetic gingivostomatitis  that due to infection with herpes simplex virus, with redness of the oral tissues, formation of multiple vesicles and painful ulcers, and fever.
necrotizing ulcerative gingivostomatitis  Plaut's or pseudomembranous angina; a type due to extension of necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis to other areas of the oral mucosa.

gingivostomatitis

[jin′jivōstō′mətī′tis]
Etymology: L, gingiva + Gk, stoma, mouth, itis, inflammation
multiple painful ulcers on the gums and mucous membranes of the mouth, the result of a herpesvirus infection. The condition most frequently affects infants and young children. It usually subsides after 1 week to 10 days, but in rare cases it may progress to a systemic viral infection. It may disguise other more serious mouth ulcers. See also herpes simplex.

gingivostomatitis

 Inflammation of the gums & oral cavity

gin·gi·vo·sto·ma·ti·tis

(jin'ji-vō-stō'mă-tī'tis)
Inflammation of the gingiva and other oral mucous membranes.
[gingivo- + G. stoma, mouth, + -itis, inflammation]

gingivostomatitis

Inflammation of the gums and the mucous membrane lining of the mouth.

gin·gi·vo·sto·ma·ti·tis

(jin'ji-vō-stō'mă-tī'tis)
Inflammation of gingiva and other oral mucous membranes.

gingivostomatitis (jin´jivōstō´mətī´tis),

n an inflammation that involves the gingivae and the oral mucosa.
gingivostomatitis, acute herpetic,
gingivostomatitis, herpetic,
n an inflammation of the gingivae and oral mucosa caused by primary invasion of herpesvirus. Herpetic gingivostomatitis occurs mainly in childhood, one attack giving immunity to generalized stomatitis but not to isolated lesions (herpetic lesions), unless an adult has had an isolated upbringing. The symptoms are red and swollen gingivae; red mucosa, which soon shows vesicles and ulcers; painful oral cavity; and elevated temperature. The course is about 14 days.
gingivostomatitis, membranous,
n a disease, or group of diseases, in which false membranes form on the gingivae and oral mucosa; the membranes are a grayish white color and are surrounded by a narrow red margin. Detachment of the membrane leaves a raw, bleeding surface. One cause is mixed pyogenic infection, in which
S. viridans and
Staphylococcus organisms predominate.
gingivostomatitis, white folded,
n See nevus spongiosus albus mucosa.

gingivostomatitis

inflammation of the gingiva and oral mucosa.

necrotizing ulcerative gingivostomatitis
that due to extension to the oral mucosa of necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis.
References in periodicals archive ?
In primary herpetic gingivostomatitis, after 1-2 days small vesicles develop on the oral mucosa.
Primary herpetic gingivostomatitis, is characterized by shallow ulcers that appear throughout oral cavity.
Thayer, DVM, ABVP, executive director of the Winn Feline Foundation, which funds studies of stem cell therapies in cats, says more will undergo the therapy as marketing targets them and research proves whether they help such inflammatory conditions as IBD, kidney disease and chronic gingivostomatitis.
These three herpes viruses, causing mononucleosis, gingivostomatitis, and exanthem subitum, respectively, remain in a steady state held at bay by cell- mediated immunity.
It is responsible for a broad range of diseases, ranging from gingivostomatitis to keratoconjunctivitis, genital disease, encephalitis, and also infection of newborn and immunocompromised patients (Whitley et al.
When clinically evident, however, the most frequent manifestation of initial HSV-1 disease in young children is primary herpetic gingivostomatitis (PHGS) (Amir et al.
Gingivostomatitis occurs in up to 30% of children with herpes simplex virus type 1 and can cause extreme discomfort.
Chronic gingivostomatitis (FCGS) is a significant disease of cats causing ulcerative, painful lesions in the mouth.
Oral herpetic lesions such as gingivostomatitis, oral and lingual ulcers, and conjunctivitis have been described, but are usually associated with immunosuppression or stress attributable to recent importation or crowded housing conditions (12,22,23).
In children, herpetic whitlow usually follows autoinoculation from primary herpetic gingivostomatitis.
7%) of 29 young children with culture-proven herpetic gingivostomatitis, confirming the role played by viral infections in the pathogenesis of infections caused by the organism (9).