gingival hyperplasia


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Related to gingival hyperplasia: gingivitis

gin·gi·val hy·per·pla·si·a

gingival enlargement due to proliferation of fibrous connective tissue.

gingival hyperplasia

an increase in the number of cells of the gum tissues, resulting in an overgrowth that may partially or totally cover the teeth; may be generalized or localized. Causes include hereditary and metabolic disorders, or drugs such as: the anticonvulsants phenytoin and carbamazepine; cyclosporine, a potent immunosuppressant used for organ transplant recipients; calcium channel blockers, such as nifedipine and amlodipine, used for the treatment of hypertension; the antibiotic erythromycin; and oral contraceptives. While the cause is considered to be multifactorial, the presence of gingival inflammation due to poor oral hygiene can contribute to the development. The presence of malpositioned teeth or orthodontic bands can exaggerate the condition. Treatment includes surgical excision of the enlarged tissue, followed by meticulous oral hygiene. Compare fibromatosis.
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Gingival hyperplasia

gin·gi·val hy·per·pla·si·a

(jinji-văl hīpĕr-plāzē-ă)
Enlargement of gums due to proliferation of fibrous connective tissue.
Synonym(s): gingival proliferation.

gin·gi·val hy·per·pla·si·a

(jinji-văl hīpĕr-plāzē-ă)
Enlargement of gums due to proliferation of fibrous connective tissue.
Synonym(s): gingival proliferation.
References in periodicals archive ?
Gingival hyperplasia in renal allograft recipients receiving cyclosporin- A & calcium antagonists.
An examination revealed a gingival hyperplasia with a major inflammatory component that covered the entire mandibular left first premolar (Fig.
These two papers are the only reports of the condition in the medical literature, however this is the first time this condition with two very important dental characteristic, namely gingival hyperplasia and failure of eruption, have been described in a dental journal.
Therefore, this was suggestive of primary eruption failure affecting these teeth, rather than secondary to gingival hyperplasia, as suggested by Houston and Shotts [1966].
Hereditary gingival fibromatosis is the most common syndromic gingival hyperplasia.
Jorgensen MG: Prevalence of amlodipine-related gingival hyperplasia.
Wynn RL: An update on calcium channel blocker-induced gingival hyperplasia.