gingival


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Related to gingival: Gingival recession, gingival graft, Gingival hyperplasia, gingival abscess, gingival inflammation

gingival

 [jin´jĭ-val]
pertaining to the gingivae.
gingival disease any disease of the gingivae, such as gingivitis. The American Academy of Periodontology classifies gingival disease as a major group of periodontal diseases and distinguishes two main subgroups, those gingival diseases induced by dental plaque and those attributed to other causes. The plaque-induced diseases may be associated with endocrine changes, medications, systemic disease, or malnutrition. The other causes of gingival lesions include viral infections, fungal infections, genetic predispositions, systemic conditions, allergic reactions, traumatic lesions, and a variety of others. See table at periodontal disease.

gin·gi·val

(jin'ji-văl), Although the correct pronunciation is gingi'val, the word is often pronounced gin'gival in the U.S. as shown here.
Relating to the gums.

gingival

(jĭn′jə-vəl, jĭn-jī′-)
adj.
Of or relating to the gums.

gingival

[jin′jival]
pertaining to the gingivae.

gin·gi·val

(jin'ji-văl)
Relating to the gums.

gingival

Pertaining to the gums.

gin·gi·val

(jin'ji-văl)
Relating to the gums.

gingival (jin´jəvəl),

adj pertaining to or in relation to the gingiva.
gingival abrasion,
n the attrition (scraping or wearing away) of the gingival tissue by harsh irritants such as coarse foods or faulty toothbrushing.
gingival anatomy,
n the gingiva, which is a dense connective tissue covered by keratinized mucosa except in the sulcus, where it is nonkeratinized. The margin is curved buccolingually with the peaks (papillae) interdentally. The sulcus depth normally is the apical limit to the free (unattached) gingiva, the attached gingiva extending from the free gingiva to the oral mucosa.
gingival architecture,
n the gingival form.
gingival blanching,
n the lightening of gingival color resulting from stretching with diminution of blood supply; usually of a temporary nature. Can occur with the injection of a vasoconstrictor found in a local anesthetic agent.
gingival bleeding,
n a prominent symptom of periodontal disease produced by ulceration of the sulcular epithelium and an inflammatory process. It can occur on probing or when the tissues are manipulated by instrumentation, oral hygiene, or eating. The blood comes from the lamina propria after ulceration of the epithelial lining.
gingival blood supply,
n the vascular supply to the gingivae arises from the vessels that pass on the gingival side of the outer periosteum of bone and anastomoses with blood vessels of the periodontal ligament and intraalveolar blood vessels.
gingival color,
n the color of the gingival tissues in health and in disease. It varies with the thickness and degree of keratinization of the epithelium, blood supply, pigmentation, and alterations produced by diseased processes affecting the gingival tissues. In health often described as coral pink, with possible areas of pigmentation.
gingival consistency,
n the visual and tactile characteristics of healthy gingival tissue. Visual consistency varies from a smooth velvet to that of an orange peel, either finely or coarsely grained. The tactile consistency of the gingival tissue should be firm and resilient.
gingival crater,
n a concave depression in the gingival tissue. Especially seen in the area of the former apex of the interdental papilla as a result of gingival destruction associated with necrotizing periodontal disease or when food impaction occurs against the tissue subjacent to the contact points of adjacent teeth.
gingival crevicular fluid,
n an older term for the serum transudate found in the gingival sulcus. Irritation and inflammation of the gingival tissue increase the flow and alter the constituents of crevicular fluid. More commonly called gingival fluid.
gingival cyanotic tissue,
n gingival tissue that appears slightly bluish red due to a reduction in oxygenated hemoglobin; may occur in conjunction with vitamin C deficiency. See also cyanosis.
gingival cyst of the adult,
gingival cyst of the newborn,
gingival discoloration,
n a change from the normal coloration of the gingivae; associated with inflammation, diminution of blood supply, and abnormal pigmentation.
gingival enlargement, drug-influenced,
n the growth of the gingival tissues, especially the interdental and papillae, resulting from the use of drugs such as those that block calcium channels or by Dilantin.
Enlarge picture
Gingival enlargement seen in a patient taking a calcium channel blocker.
gingival erythema, linear (LGE),
n a characteristic of a necrotizing periodontal condition in an HIV-positive patient. A band of acute erythema located at the gingival margin.
gingival erythema, lingual,
n a band of acute erythema located at the inside gingival margin (next to the tongue).
gingival fibroblast,
n a formative cell that moderates wound healing and healing after treatment. See also fibroblast.
gingival fibromatosis,
gingival graft,
gingival hemorrhage,
n the excessive bleeding of the gingival tissues; usually at the interpapillary crest, the gingival margin, or in the crevicular sulcus. It can be due to severe periodontal diseases or medical complications (e.g., leukemia).
gingival hormonal enlargement,
n an enlargement of the gingivae associated with hormonal imbalance during pregnancy or puberty.
gingival mat,
n the gingival connective tissue composed of coarse, broad collagen fibers that serve to attach the gingivae to the teeth and to hold the free gingivae in close approximation to the teeth.
gingival physiology,
n the gingivae encircle the teeth and serve as a protective mucosal covering for the underlying tissues; the gingival fiber apparatus serves as a barrier to apical migration of the epithelial attachment and binds the gingival tissues to the teeth. The normal topography permits the free flow of food away from the occlusal surfaces and from the cervical and interproximal areas of the teeth.
gingival pigmentation,
n the variations in gingival color may be correlated with the racial diversity of an individual or may be a reflection of pathologic influences, such as the melanin pigmentation associated with hypoadrenocorticism (Addison's disease), nevi, and depositions of heavy metals. See also melanin and melanosis.
gingival pocket,
n a localized deepening of the gingival crevice of 2 mm or more.
gingival position,
n the level of the gingival margin in relation to the tooth.
gingival recession,
n the apical migration of the gingival crest.
gingival shrinkage,
n the reduction in size of gingival tissue, principally by diminution of edema, usually as a result of therapeutic elimination of subgingival deposits and curettement of the soft tissue wall of the pocket.
gingival stippling,
n a series of small depressions characterizing the surface of healthy gingivae, varying from a smooth velvet to that of an orange peel.
gingival sulcus,
n the space between the free gingiva and the tooth.
gingival surface texture,
n the texture of the attached gingivae, which normally is stippled; in inflammatory conditions, the edema, cellular infiltration, and concomitant swelling cause loss of the surface stippling, and the gingivae take on a smooth, shiny, edematous appearance.
gingival third,
n the most apical one third of a given clinical crown or of an axial surface cavity or preparation.
gingival topography,
n the form of the healthy gingival tissues. The marginal gingivae and the interdental papillae have a characteristic shape.

gingival

pertaining to or emanating from the gum.

gingival hypertrophy, gingival hyperplasia
general or local gum overgrowth which may be severe enough to cover the crowns of the teeth and prevent the mouth from being closed. Common only in dogs. May be localized to one or several teeth, resulting in discrete, tumorlike masses (epulis), or diffuse, affecting the gums at all teeth locations. The latter form is familial in Boxer dogs and inherited as a recessive trait in Swedish silver foxes.
gingival index
a graded assessment of gingival health used in periodontal charting.
gingival pocket
see periodontal pocket.
gingival recession
the free gingival margin may recede towards the tooth root in association with resorption of alveolar and supporting bone in periodontal disease in dogs and cats. The cemento-enamel junction and root surface become exposed contributing to progression of dental disease.
gingival vascular hamartoma
rare congenital vascular anomaly on the gums of calves; lobulated masses covered with mucosa but may be traumatized; consist of vascular channels.
References in periodicals archive ?
A one-way ANOVA and Duncan's test for post hoc analysis was used to evaluate the differences of the gelatinolytic activity of pro-MMP-2, MMP-2 and proMMP-9 among the independent cultures of U937 macrophages and human gingival fibroblasts, as well as their co-cultures.
Discussion: Removal of gingival melanin pigmentation can be performed safely by open spray cryotherapy in dermatology clinics.
A commercially available Human Gingival Epithelial Progenitor cell line (HGEP, ZenBio, Research Triangle Park, NC) obtained from a single donor was expanded using routine cell culture techniques.
The significance of age, proximal caries, gingival inflammation, probing depths and the loss of lamina dura in the diagnosis of alveolar bone loss in the primary molars.
The buccinator muscle, pterygomandibular raphe, and retromolar trigone are well delineated with cheek distension, and the location of a tumor on the buccal mucosa or gingival mucosa is clearly identified.
Various causes of GE can be grouped as follows: 1) Inflammatory, 2) Medication-induced, 3) Idiopathic gingival fibromatosis (hereditary/syndrome associated), 4) Systemic causes of GE, 5) False GE (underlying osseous lesions, dental tissues) & 6) Others (mouth breathers).
On examination, there was a gingival defect in between canine and lateral incisor.
Immunohistochemical analysis was used to measure inducible nitric oxide synthase expression in gingiva and nitric oxide levels in gingival crevicular fluid were spectrophotometrically measured.
Gingival hypertrophy, hirsutism and coarsening of facial features are well-recognised adverse effects; however, side-effects such as osteomalacia are often forgotten.
The book's highly illustrated and detailed articles cover topics such as prosthetic gingival restoration, porcelain jacket crowns, ultraconservative esthetic rehabilitation using lithium disilicate ceramic, opacity control of zirconia restorations, and noninvasive pontic site development.
Methods: Healthy human gingival samples (n=15) were collected from patients undergoing orthodontic extraction.