ginger

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Related to ginger ale: Vernors Ginger Ale

gin·ger

(jin'jĕr),
The dried rhizome of Zingiber officinale (family Zingiberaceae), known in commerce as Jamaica ginger, African ginger, and Cochin ginger The outer cortical layers are often either partially or completely removed; used as a carminative and flavoring agent.
Synonym(s): zingiber

ginger

/gin·ger/ (jin´jer) the leafy herb Zingiber officinale, or the dried rhizome, which is used as a flavoring agent, in the treatment of digestive disorders, and to prevent motion sickness.

ginger

an herb native to the tropics of Asia and now cultivated in the tropics of South America, China, India, Africa, the Caribbean, and parts of the United States.
uses It is considered safe when consumed in food. Medicinal amounts of the herb are used for nausea, motion sickness, indigestion, and inflammation. It does appear to be effective against motion sickness but does not help treat nausea from other causes (e.g., opioid analgesia, chemotherapy). Its efficacy as an antiinflammatory drug has not been established.
contraindications It is not recommended during pregnancy (it may be an abortifacient when taken in large amounts) or lactation, in children, or in those with known hypersensitivity to this product. It should not be used in cholelithiasis unless directed by a physician. Safety when large amounts of ginger are ingested for medicinal purposes has not been established.

ginger

A deciduous plant rich in volatile oil, with borneol, camphene, cineol, citral, gingerols, shogaols, zingerones (phenylalkylketones) and phelandrene.
 
Alternative nutrition
Ginger has a long tradition as a health food, and its various uses include: as a digestive aid; to prevent nausea due to motion sickness, morning sickness or chemotherapy; for cardiovascular disease, as ginger reduces cholesterol; and it may be useful in preventing cancer.
 
Chinese medicine
Ginger is a fixture in Chinese herbal medicine: the rhizomes are antiemetic, cardiotonic, carminative, rubifacient and stimulate secretion, and it is used to treat abdominal pain, burns, colds, hangovers, hypercholesterolaemia, motion sickness, pancreatitis, Raynaud phenomenon, nausea, seafood intoxication and vomiting.

Herbal medicine
Ginger has been used in Western herbal medicine for arthritic pain, earache, gout, headache, kidney conditions, menstrual cramping, motion sickness, sinusitis and vertigo.

gin·ger

(jin'jĕr)
The dried rhizome of Zingiber officinale, known in commerce as Jamaica ginger, African ginger, and Cochin ginger. The outer cortical layers are often either partially or completely removed; used as a carminative and flavoring agent.
[L. zingiber]

ginger,

n Latin name:
Zingiber officinale; parts used: roots; uses: stimulates digestion, colic, flatulence, nausea, indigestion, expectorant; precautions: none known, but long-term use of large doses can aggravate heat sensitivities.
Enlarge picture
Ginger.

ginger

produced from the rhizomes of Zingiber officinale; used as a carminative, stimulant and antiemetic.
References in periodicals archive ?
To learn more about Schweppes Dark Ginger Ale and other Schweppes flavors, please visit http://www.
In small saucepan, combine ginger ale, vinegar and palm sugar.
Erected on the site of the old Vernors Ginger Ale factory by Grand Rapids-based Prime Development, South University Village is scheduled for completion in the spring/summer of 2008 and is expected to generate more than 195 temporary construction-related jobs and approximately 65 new jobs associated with a bank, retail operations and parking structure at the site.
I mix it with ginger ale now, but I drink red wine more than anything, which apparently is better for you.
The drink is the color of cider, has a tea-like aroma and is described as tasting like a cross between lemonade and ginger ale.
Available in cola, ginger ale and lemon-lime varieties, a 12-ounce bottle of Celsius has a suggested retail price of $1.
Add bourbon and ginger ale, stir well, then pour into a sugared martini glass.
Non-cola sodas, like Canada Dry ginger ale, Mountain Dew and Sprite, are the hardest on teeth because of acidic flavor additives.
Served neat, with ice or a mixer such as ginger ale, Grant's Cask Reserves will be a real treat for whisky lovers to receive this Christmas.
Some common uses of ginger ale as digestive aid, to decrease colic and flatulence, for the flu, colds, coughs and headaches.
Why do doctors often recommend ginger ale to combat dehydration during a bout of flu?