redwood

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Related to giant redwoods: Redwood National Park

redwood

see SEQUOIA.

redwood

References in periodicals archive ?
2) It should be noted here that the coastal redwoods (Sequoia sempervirens) and the giant redwoods (Sequoiadendron giganteum) are separate varieties that were both exhibited in the East.
Giant Redwoods, like this one in California, could be used to helpWelsh timber production
These giant redwoods were more than 300 years old, still growing and would have lived to well beyond 1,000 years.
California has some amazing sights like the giant Redwoods plus San Francisco's Golden Gate Bridge and Alcatraz, so it's great when people come to visit.
People living in the four luxury apartments, which combine the very best of the Victorian architecture with stylish modern living, share the spacious garden, which has giant redwoods imported by the Bainbridge family.
Eventually, very far north, in a narrow strip near the coast that is the only place they grow on the planet, the giant redwoods appear--and with them, batteries of logging trucks: great tractor trailers, sneezing on your bumper as you round curves, each one carrying its load of redwood trunks, denuded of limbs, impossibly long.
does suggest the Grizzly Giant, the treasure of the Mariposa Grove, the first, the most remarkable of those tall trees, the giant redwoods, to which Carleton Watkins brought his camera a century before.
The magnificent branching elkhorn corals live close to shore and are "the giant redwoods of the reef," says Porter.
Although judging by the number of people who claim to have a genuine piece, the goalposts must have been the size of giant redwoods.
Among our plant treasures are the giant redwoods of coastal California, the world's tallest trees, with individual specimens rising as high as a 35-story office building.
Barnum aspects, yet at the same time created a powerful constituency to preserve the giant redwoods.
In the first poem in the collection, "From Below," she compares walking among giant redwoods to a child under the table listening to the conversation of the adults above.