panda

(redirected from giant panda)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Financial, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

panda

includes Ailuropoda melanoleuca (giant panda) and Ailurus fulgens (lesser panda). Arboreal, plantigrade animal, vegetarian for the most part but may be omnivorous in some circumstances. Black and white in color with a white face and a black patch around each eye. The lesser or red panda has glossy red fur on its back The genera vary in size from a large cat to a small bear.
References in periodicals archive ?
Here, we report a confirmed case of pH1N1 virus infection in giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) in China.
In 2004, just 1,600 giant pandas remained in the wild, mainly in the Sichuan province.
Animal care experts from both China and Canada have been granted special flight privileges to accompany the giant pandas onboard the aircraft to ensure the animals' safety and comfort.
China is also playing a role in protecting the habitat of the giant panda, its national animal.
Biodiversity expert Prof Bruford has been working in China studying giant pandas since 1999, and was one of only two scientists from the UK to work in the team.
SCIENTISTS today predicted there are many more giant pandas in the wild than previously thought.
The Tokyo District Court also fined Yasunori Ueda 800,000 yen, the amount for which he sold the stuffed giant panda to Noboru Ichii, 45, of Sakai, Osaka Prefecture.
For 25 years, the World Wildlife Fund Giant Panda Program and China's State Forestry Administration have worked together to protect pandas by creating reserves, helping abolish logging near panda habitats, and replenishing forests.
LING Ling the giant panda was back at Tokyo Zoo yesterday after a failed third attempt to mate with pandas in Mexico.
After all, to paraphrase Confucius, ``The journey of a giant panda begins with a single check.
A GIANT panda named 'Number 20' gave birth to twin cubs yesterday in southwestern China, the second pair born in the country in the past week.
It's the story of Ruth Harkness, who travelled to the forests of China in the 1930s to bring the first real-live giant panda to the United States.