get

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get

the total offspring of an individual male; refers usually to a stallion.
References in classic literature ?
She was getting away from Tipton and Freshitt, and her own sad liability to tread in the wrong places on her way to the New Jerusalem.
In panic the head hunters made a wild dash for the two remaining prahus, for Muda Saffir had succeeded in getting away from the island in safety.
But then'--and here was the vexation--'how came it to be that man; how comes he to have this influence over her; how came she to favour his getting away from me; and, more than all, how came she not to say it was a sudden fright, and nothing more?
It will get out among my boys, and it will not be a particularly quiet business getting away any of my fellows, if they know it, I'll promise you.
One day, therefore, I went up inland that I might pray heaven to show me some means of getting away.
She said she did not wonder, but remarked that, after all, one could always carry an extra rug, and that every form of travel had its hardships; to which he abruptly returned that he thought them all of no account compared with the blessedness of getting away.
I seized desperately on the first excuse that occurred to me for getting away from him.
I suppose they find it sleepy work; for certain it is that spring after spring the same thing happens, fifty of them getting away in spite of all our precautions, and we are left with our mouths open and much out of pocket.
He felt that he was probably a fool to take that view of the thing, but that was the way he was built and there was no getting away from it.
Tall and well proportioned as an ancient gladiator, and muscular as a Spartan, he walked for a quarter of an hour without knowing where to direct his steps, actuated by the sole idea of getting away from the spot where if he lingered he knew that he would surely be taken.
One had only to approach a roulette table, begin to play, and then openly grab some one else's winnings, for a din to be raised, and the thief to start vociferating that the stake was HIS; and, if the coup had been carried out with sufficient skill, and the witnesses wavered at all in their testimony, the thief would as likely as not succeed in getting away with the money, provided that the sum was not a large one--not large enough to have attracted the attention of the croupiers or some fellow-player.
Washington had much the same difficulty in getting away, but she was anxious to go because she thought that I needed the rest.