gestalt psychology


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Related to gestalt psychology: Humanistic psychology, gestalt therapy

psychology

 [si-kol´o-je]
the science dealing with the mind and mental processes, especially in relation to human and animal behavior. adj., adj psycholog´ic, psycholog´ical.
analytic psychology (analytical psychology) the system of psychology founded by Carl Gustav Jung, based on the concepts of the collective unconscious and the complex.
clinical psychology the use of psychologic knowledge and techniques in the treatment of persons with emotional difficulties.
community psychology the application of psychological principles to the study and support of the mental health of individuals in their social sphere.
criminal psychology the study of the mentality, the motivation, and the social behavior of criminals.
depth psychology the study of unconscious mental processes.
developmental psychology the study of changes in behavior that occur with age.
dynamic psychology psychology stressing the causes and motivations for behavior.
environmental psychology study of the effects of the physical and social environment on behavior.
experimental psychology the study of the mind and mental operations by the use of experimental methods.
forensic psychology psychology dealing with the legal aspects of behavior and mental disorders.
gestalt psychology gestaltism; the theory that the objects of mind, as immediately presented to direct experience, come as complete unanalyzable wholes or forms that cannot be split into parts.
individual psychology the psychiatric theory of Alfred adler, stressing compensation and overcompensation for feelings of inferiority and the interpersonal nature of a person's problems.
physiologic psychology (physiological psychology) the branch of psychology that studies the relationship between physiologic and psychologic processes.
social psychology psychology that focuses on social interaction, on the ways in which actions of others influence the behavior of an individual.

ge·stalt·ism

(ge-stahlt'izm),
The theory in psychology that the objects of mind come as complete forms or configurations which cannot be split into parts; for example, a square is perceived as such rather than as four discrete lines.
[see gestalt]

Gestalt psychology

n.
The school or theory in psychology holding that psychological, physiological, and behavioral phenomena are irreducible experiential configurations not derivable from a simple summation of perceptual elements such as sensation and response.

Gestalt psychology

a school of psychology, originating in Germany, that maintains that a psychological phenomenon is perceived as a total configuration or pattern, rising from the relationships among its constituent elements, rather than as discrete elements possessing attributes of their own, and that the pattern, or Gestalt, cannot be derived from the summation of its constituents. Thus learning is regarded as resulting from insight, defined as a process or reorganization, rather than from association or trial and error, and behavior is seen as an integrated response to a unitary situation rather than as a series of reflexes and sensations. Also called configurationism, Gestaltism. See also Gestalt.

gestalt psychology

Psychiatry A school of psychology that emphasizes a total perceptual configuration and interrelationships of its components

ge·stalt·ism

, gestalt psychology (ge-stahlt'izm, ges-tahlt' sī-kol'ŏ-jē)
The theory in psychology that the objects of mind come as complete forms or configurations that cannot be split into parts; e.g., a square is perceived as such rather than as four discrete lines.

gestalt psychology

A school of psychology that held that phenomena, to be understood, must be viewed as structured, organized whole entities (gestalten). Thus the gestalt of a melody remains recognizable whether it be sung, played on a flute or heavily orchestrated. Gestalt theories have had an impact on the physiology of perception, but the philosophic view that psychological phenomena are irreducible gestalts no longer commands much support.
References in periodicals archive ?
One is theoretical, derived within Gestalt psychology itself.
LS: The reference to Gestalt psychology is appropriate for the period when Bataille formulated the informe, but what we now know about the physiological act of seeing is at variance with these Cartesian axes.
What do you get when you combine 100 corrections staff, 300 inmates, a bunch of videotapes and a lot of multisyllabic words, like constructive motivation and Gestalt psychology, in a classroom?
The influence of these opposed points of view is evident both in Schiller's acceptance of gestalt psychology and in the interest in motor phenomena which came to dominate much of his later research.
Ellis A Sourcebook in Gestalt Psychology, 1938) might have alerted Crump to the need for a more cogent reflection on the 'elementary cognition' of number, or the place of this cognition in human activity in general, esoteric or not.
Beginning with precise instructions on how to hold the brash and apply the ink to the paper's surface, Reed proceeds to cite connections between Eastern and Western intelligence, commenting on such disaparate topics as gestalt psychology and Western concepts of space.
She considers the existential phenomenology of Martin Heidegger as a backdrop to Merleau-Ponty's work, his relationship to gestalt psychology, intellectual prejudices that get in the way of doing phenomenology, what the body is in Merleau-Ponty's phenomenology, perception of the world, the problem of other minds, speech and gestures, as well as Merleau-Ponty's legacy in the study of women, animals and other topics.
Certainly the implication of Gestalt Psychology is that this is a very artificial method of approaching a work.
00--Today, too little is heard about Aron Gurwitsch (1901-73), who was one of the clearest expositors of Edmund Husserl's later philosophy and who, like Maurice Merleau-Ponty, brought together in fruitful synthesis the findings of phenomenology and Gestalt psychology.