gerontology

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aging

 [āj´ing]
the gradual changes in the structure of any organism that occur with the passage of time, that do not result from disease or other gross accidents, and that eventually lead to the increased probability of death as the individual grows older. See also aged and senescence, and see the Atlas on Aging.

ger·on·tol·o·gy

(jer'on-tol'ŏ-jē),
The scientific study of the clinical, sociologic, biologic and psychological phenomena related to aging.
Synonym(s): geratology
[geronto- + G. logos, study]

gerontology

/ger·on·tol·o·gy/ (jer″on-tol´ah-je) the scientific study of aging in all its aspects.

gerontology

(jĕr′ən-tŏl′ə-jē)
n.
The scientific study of the biological, psychological, and sociological phenomena associated with old age and aging.

ge·ron′to·log′i·cal (jə-rŏn′tə-lŏj′ĭ-kəl), ge·ron′to·log′ic (-lŏj′ĭk) adj.
ger′on·tol′o·gist n.

gerontology

[jer′əntol′əjē]
Etymology: Gk, geras, old age, logos, science
the study of all aspects of the aging process, including the clinical, psychological, economic, and sociological issues encountered by older persons and their consequences for both the individual and society.

gerontology

Geriatics The systematic study of aging and age-related phenomena; senescence is attributed to
1. Accumulation of degradation products, coupled with a cell's ↑ inability to metabolize the products and/or.
2. Activation of longevity-determining or aging genes, that may be intimately linked to certain oncogenes–eg, c-fos, which evokes uncontrolled cell proliferation. See Garbage can hypothesis.

ger·on·tol·o·gy

(jer'ŏn-tol'ŏ-jē)
The scientific study of the process and problems of aging.
[geronto- + G. logos, study]

gerontology

The study of the biology, psychology and sociology of ageing. Gerontology is concerned with the changes that occur in the cells, tissues and organs of the body with age, with the natural limits of cell reproduction, the causes of natural cell death, the effects of life style and physical activity on longevity and the psychological and sociological effects of ageing.

ger·on·tol·o·gy

(jer'ŏn-tol'ŏ-jē)
Scientific study of clinical, sociologic, biologic, and psychological phenomena related to aging.
[geronto- + G. logos, study]

gerontology (jer″ontol´əje),

n the comprehensive (physical, psychologic, and social) study of aging.
References in periodicals archive ?
Even when the career and business aspects are put aside, the truth is that our seniors both need and deserve the care and assistance which only a gerontologist can provide them with.
In recent years, gerontologists have learned that some changes in the structure and function of the aging cardiovascular system, even in a healthy older person without any diagnosed medical condition, can actually greatly increase the risk of developing cardiovascular diseases, including high blood pressure, atherosclerosis, and heart failure.
Law enforcement gerontologists can do this by melding existing gerontological research with the law enforcement mission.
the Advance 50 Team of gerontologists at The Hartford Financial Services Group, Inc.
Where gerontologists once looked for a single, all-encompassing theory to explain aging--a single gene, for instance, or the decline of the immune system--they are now finding multiple processes, combining and interacting on many levels.
A panel of noted professionals in the 55+ seniors housing field, including builders, architects, designers and gerontologists, will judge entries and present gold and silver awards to current and "on-the-boards" projects in various active adult housing, continuing care retirement community, congregate care community, assisted living, special needs housing and renovated seniors housing categories.
Although something is lost thereby the book has much to recommend it to gerontologists.
NYSE: HIG), through its Advance 50 Team of corporate financial gerontologists, and the MIT AgeLab recently joined forces to explore how men and women perceive retirement and worry (or don't) about what it may mean for them.
This unique publication will draw interest from a wide audience: art, science, and culture historians, as well as gerontologists and demographers.
For endocrinologists, urologists, andrologists and sexologists, primary care physicians, gerontologists, diabetologists, and cardiologists.
These scientists, called gerontologists, ponder other fundamental questions.
Among the authors of 16 chapters (eight each from participants from Heidelberg and from Pavia) are such notable gerontologists as S.