nursing

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nurs·ing

(nŭrs'ing),
1. Feeding an infant at the breast; tending and caring for a child.
2. The scientific application of principles of care related to prevention of illness and care during illness.

nursing

/nurs·ing/ (nurs´ing)
1. the provision, at various levels of preparation, of services essential to or helpful in the promotion, maintenance, and restoration of health and well-being or in prevention of illness, as of infants, of sick and injured, or of others for any reason unable to provide such services for themselves.

nursing

(nûr′sĭng)
n.
1. The profession of a nurse.
2. The tasks or care of a nurse.

nursing

1 the practice in which a nurse assists "the individual, sick or well, in the performance of those activities contributing to health or its recovery (or to a peaceful death) that he would perform unaided if he had the necessary strength, will or knowledge. And to do this in such a way as to help him gain independence as rapidly as possible" (Virginia Henderson).
2 "the diagnosis and treatment of human responses to actual or potential health problems" (American Nurses Association). There are four principal characteristics that further define nursing care: the phenomena that concern nurses; the use of theories to observe the need for nursing intervention and to plan nursing action; the nursing action taken; and an evaluation of the effects of the actions relative to the phenomena. This definition of nursing provides a framework for the nursing process, including data collection, diagnosis, planning, treatment, and evaluation. The nursing process is supported by standards of nursing practice that are congruent with the definition and that provide more specific guidelines for practice. These standards include systematic, continuous collection of data concerning the health status of the client in recorded form that is accessible and that may be communicated. A nursing diagnosis is derived from the data collected. A plan for nursing care incorporates goals derived from the nursing diagnosis and the priorities and approaches to achieve the goals as indicated by the nursing diagnosis. Nursing actions, which are selected and performed with the client's participation, provide for promotion, maintenance, or restoration of the client's health and serve to maximize the client's health care abilities. The progress or lack of progress toward the goal is mutually determined by the client and the nurse, resulting in reassessment, reordering of priorities, establishment of new goals, and revision of the plan for nursing care. Nursing touches on, intersects with, and complements other professional roles in health care, addressing itself to a wide range of health-related responses in people who are well and in those who are not. Nursing seeks to diagnose and treat the response to the problem; thus the concerns of nursing are less circumscribed and discrete than those of other health-related professions. These concerns include the following: limitations of the client's self-care ability; impaired ability to function in any fundamental area such as sleeping, breathing, eating, maintaining circulation; pain, anxiety, fear, loneliness, grief, or other physical or emotional problems related to health, illness, or treatment; impaired social or intellectual processes; impaired ability to make decisions and choices; alteration of self-image as required by the change in health; dysfunctional perception of health or health care activities; extra demands posed by such normal life processes as birth, growth, or death; and difficulty in affiliative relationships. Various concepts, principles, processes, and actions developed and examined in nursing research guide the steps in the nursing process from initial observation and diagnosis through evaluation, based on intrapersonal, interpersonal, and systems theories. The boundary for nursing practice is not static; it tends to move outward as the needs and capacities of society change. Collegial, collaborative practice with members of other health care professions further softens the boundaries of nursing practice. All health care professionals share a mission and a scientific data base, and to some degree their practices overlap. At its core, nursing is nurturative, generative, and protective; preventive care is a part of every nurse's practice. Nurses value independence and self-respect. They are guided by an ethical and humanitarian philosophy in which every human being deserves respect, regardless of racial, social, cultural, sexual, economic, religious, or other factors. The nurse practices in the context of a relationship with the client, family, or group that is professional and yet close, in an interpersonal sense. The function of a nurse involves the physical intimacy of laying on of hands; compassion and constant recognition of the person's dignity are essential. Nursing is practiced by specialists and generalists. Generalists provide most nursing care; specialists, having added to their basic knowledge an organized and systematized body of knowledge and competencies, practice in specialized areas of nursing. Nursing care is given to people at all stages of life in the home, hospital, place of employment, school, or any environment where nursing care is needed. Nurses are ethically and legally accountable for their practice and for delegation of responsibilities to others.
3 the professional practice of a nurse.
4 the process of acting as a nurse, of providing care that encourages and promotes the health of the person or persons being served. See also nursing process.

nursing

(1) Breast-feeding, see there.
(2) The provision of nursing care.

nursing

adjective
1. Breast-feeding, see there.
2. The provision of nursing care. See Forensic nursing, Intensive nursing.

nurs·ing

(nŭrs'ing)
1. A discipline, profession, and area of practice. As a discipline, nursing is centered on knowledge development. Emphasis is placed on discovering, describing, extending, and modifying knowledge for professional nursing practice. As a profession, nursing has a social mandate to be responsible and accountable to the public it serves. Nursing is an integral part of the health care system, and as such encompasses the promotion of health, prevention of illness, and care of physically ill, mentally ill, and disabled people of all ages, in all health care settings and other community contexts. Within this broad spectrum of health care, the phenomena of particular concern to nurses are individual, family, and group "responses to actual or potential health problems." The human responses range broadly from health-restoring reactions to an individual episode of illness to the development of policy in promoting the long-term health of a population.
2. Feeding an infant at the breast; tending and caring for a young child.

nursing

The application of medical and humanitarian principles, by a person ancillary to the medical profession, so as to maintain health and fitness, assist in recovery from mental or physical illness or injury, relieve pain or distress or ease the process of dying.

nurs·ing

(nŭrs'ing)
1. Feeding an infant at the breast; tending and caring for a child.
2. The scientific application of principles of care related to prevention of illness and care during illness.

nursing,

n 1. the performance of those activities that contribute to the health or recovery of a patient (or to a peaceful death).
n 2. the application of prescribed therapies and the management of the patient and environment to assist in healing.
nursing bottle caries,
n dental caries of the maxillary primary teeth caused by the oral retention of milk or formula in the oral cavity.
nursing home,
n a convalescent facility for the care of individuals who do not require hospitalization but who cannot be cared for at home. Preferred nomenclature: extended care facility.

nursing


artificial nursing
feeding on milk replacer; implies by sucking a teat, on a bottle or a multiple sucking device usually described as a calfeteria.
nursing sickness
a disease of lactating mink characterized by aimless wandering, anorexia, emaciation and hepatic lipidosis. No specific cause has been identified.

Patient discussion about nursing

Q. What is the best school for nurses in California?

A. i found a site that rank nursing schools in the U.S. , looks reliable, check it out:
http://www.nursingschools.com/articles/ranking.html

Q. is there a nurses community in this site?!

A. Here: http://www.imedix.com/Nurses.

Do you work as a nurse yourself? Do you have any special interest or questions about nursing?

Q. how do i join the nurses community?

A. Go to 'My stuff' and then click on 'add your health interests', then add the tag "Nurses" to 'my interests'.
Once you have added it, click on 'save changes'.

More discussions about nursing
References in periodicals archive ?
The implications for gerontological nursing practice are outlined and suggestions offered as to how personal autonomy for older persons living in residential care may be preserved and promoted.
In the past several years, significant efforts have been made to improve the quality of gerontological nursing content in nursing education programs at both the pre-licensure level (American Association of Colleges of Nursing [AACN], 2010; National League for Nursing [NLN], 2011), and at the graduate level (National Council of State Boards of Nursing, 2008).
In 1997, visionary nursing faculty at our university included gerontological nursing courses as part of the curricular revisions in the generic baccalaureate and RN to BSN programs.
Carol Brink, RN, MPH, is Associate Professor of Clinical Nursing and Chief of Gerontological Nursing at the University of Rochester.
Her contributions to geriatric literature are included in Chronic Illness: Impact and Interventions, NGNA Core Curriculum for Gerontological Nursing, Handbook for Care of the Older Adult with Cancer, NGNA Core Curriculum for Gerontological Advanced Practice Nurses, and numerous other texts and journals.
At the University, we viewed the partnership as an opportunity to improve the level of professional nursing practice in nursing homes and build up the gerontological nursing specialty.
She is a member of National Gerontological Nursing Association as well as secretary for the local chapter.
Appreciating the Complexity in Care of Older Adults For this subtheme, students identified curricular content that would increase the value of gerontological nursing with statements such as: "If the field was more specific, like 'gero patients and surgery' or 'gero and oncology' as opposed to basic health care, I think I would be more interested or be more receptive to the field.
She is an Associate Editor of "Nutrition in Clinical Practice" and is a member of the Editorial Board of "Nursing Research," the "Journal of Wound Ostomy and Continence Nursing," and the "Journal of Gerontological Nursing.
The research project arose out of the section's national conference in 2000 and work being done by one of its guest speakers, University of Sheffield professor of gerontological nursing, Mike Nolan.
SESSION 2: The importance of gerontological nursing as a specialty; nurses are encouraged to develop their own knowledge base and assessment skills
THE FIRST professor of gerontological nursing in the United Kingdom (UK), Mike Nolan, will be the keynote speaker at the NZNO-organised national caregivers conference ha Auckland on March 19 and 20.