germline


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germline

 [jerm´līn]
the sequence of cells in the line of direct descent from zygote to gametes, as opposed to somatic cells (all other body cells). Mutations in germline cells are transmitted to offspring; those in somatic cells are not.

germline

or

germ line

(jûrm′līn′)
n.
1. The gamete-producing cells in a sexually reproducing organism, by means of which genetic material is passed on to subsequent generations.
2. The collection or sequence of such cells in an individual and all its descendants.

germ line

, germline
The cells from which the gametes (the ova and sperm) originate.
References in periodicals archive ?
Loss of nuclear expression of MSH6 only: high probability of Lynch syndrome (sequencing and/or large deletion/duplication testing of germline MSH6 is indicated) *
Intelligence--the holy grail of germline editing--involves incredibly complex interactions between myriad genes and environmental factors.
It may be that some countries will never permit germline genome editing because of moral and ethical concerns.
At the 2017 Annual Meeting, I will continue that conversation with a plenary on the ongoing proposed guidelines concerning somatic, germline, curative, and enhancement uses in human beings, and will include Christian insights and purpose that might shape our response.
Furthermore, regardless of germline BRCA status, cancers have high rates of genetic mutation.
In the study, Wu and her colleagues isolated and characterized female germline stem cells from a single transgenic mouse with cells that show green fluorescence when activated by a blue laser.
as a monotherapy in patients with deleterious or suspected deleterious germline BRCA-mutated advanced ovarian cancer who have been treated with three or more prior lines of chemotherapy.
I had the privilege of attending the International Summit on Human Gene Editing, and the take-home message for me was that from an experimental perspective, human somatic and germline gene editing are acceptable within local (and global) regulatory and ethical/ moral frameworks.
But moral, ethical and safety concerns would make it "irresponsible" to proceed with clinical studies in germline cells--eggs, sperm, embryos and other cells that transmit DNA to future generations, the statement added.
The issue is whether to use the technique to alter human eggs, sperm or early embryos in ways that would be passed on, a process that is called germline editing.
By blocking germline cells from sending the signal, Richard I.
But the IBC report cautions that "this development seems to require particular precautions and raises serious concerns, especially if the editing of the human genome should be applied to the germline and therefore introduce hereditary modifications, which could be transmitted to future generations.