germinate

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germinate

(jûr′mə-nāt′)
v. germi·nated, germi·nating, germi·nates
v.tr.
To cause to sprout or grow.
v.intr.
1. To begin to sprout or grow.
2. To come into existence: An idea germinated in his mind.

ger′mi·na′tion n.
ger′mi·na′tive adj.
ger′mi·na′tor n.
References in periodicals archive ?
Gravity-directed calcium current in germinating spores of Ceratopteris richardii.
Here the energy remains fundamentally impregnable, immaterial, while germinating aesthetic, perceptual, and concrete forms.
Seeds incubated in water, at 22[degrees]C, in the dark, began germinating two days later.
The border plants are really enjoying all this moisture and seem to growing by the day - but the weeds are also germinating and you will need to stop them before they start to nick nutrients from your prized specimens.
On the positive side, if the seed is germinating and the plants are growing, then this isn't a catastrophe.
The blood meal was not added to the mixture that was used for the 3/4 inch germinating blocks nor for some plants such as impatiens that do not need the extra nitrogen.
Went (1948) divided desert plants of the Joshua Tree National Monument (California) into five groups according to the time of germination: 1) summer-germinating annuals, 2) summer-germinating plants that flower during the following spring, 3) winter-germinating spring annuals, 4) plants capable of germinating at any time of the year, and 5) woody perennials.
Though the keys to germinating a certain few seeds have eluded him for 30 years, he's still looking for clues to their secret lives.
This work has real-life application to the germinating fields of Personalized Medicine and Qualitative Forensics, and helps to lay the foundation for a brand-new area of medical research called Phenomics.
Whereas crop seeds are more predictable, germinating over a wide range of conditions, those of many horticultural species and also wild plants often have very specific requirements.
Both these products performed poorly overall in the seed sowing tests, with less than 40 per cent of seeds germinating when sown in these products.
SCIENTISTS at the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew have defied all expectations by germinating 200-year-old seeds which are now growing into vigorous young plants.