germ warfare


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germ warfare

n.
The use of injurious microorganisms, such as bacteria or viruses, as weapons in warfare.
A hypothetical military technique that could be used by either nations or non-governmental bodies—e.g., the use of pathogens—viruses, bacteria, other disease-causing biological agents, or the toxins produced by them as biological weapons
References in periodicals archive ?
It concluded that germ warfare had been deployed exactly as the North Koreans claimed.
When it comes to germ warfare, anthrax has been popular for about 100 years because it can be easily produced and stored.
But the germ warfare team, known as Unit 731, gave up the plan after being told by then top commanders of the Imperial Japanese Army, ''Don't die in vain,'' the researchers said.
He gained his PhD in 1974 after studying engineering in Birmingham and in 1993 left his wife to marry Dr Rihab Taha, a British-trained scientist known as 'Dr Chemical' after heading her country's germ warfare research programme.
Early in the 1980s, journalists Harris and Paxman produced a BBC television documentary on gas and germ warfare from WW I to the fall of the Soviet Union and followed it up with this compelling book in 1982.
Bush - in response to possible germ warfare by terrorists - outlined a plan for smallpox vaccinations that called for each state to vaccinate professionals who would come into contact and manage suspected local smallpox cases.
The Tokyo District Court on Tuesday admitted Japan waged germ warfare in China during World War II and caused harm to residents, but it dismissed a claim by a group of Chinese plaintiffs that the government compensate for the atrocities.
Now Hatfill, a former Army researcher and germ warfare expert, is receiving similar treatment based on a hodgepodge of clues, including his authorship of an unpublished novel about a biological warfare attack on Congress.
A MASSIVE pounds 32 million earmarked for essential health care has been used for smallpox vaccine in case of a germ warfare attack, the Sunday People can reveal.
The Department of Health yesterday announced it was buying enough vaccine to protect 16 million people in the event of a germ warfare attack.
The Department of Health yesterday announced that it was buying stocks of smallpox vaccine sufficient to protect 16 million people in the event of a germ warfare attack.
But what of the modem risk of bioterrorism and germ warfare, and the possible reappearance of a disease like smallpox, against which most modern-day Americans have not been adequately vaccinated?