germ line

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germ line

a collection of haploid cells derived from the specialized cells of the primitive gonad.

germ line

genetic material in a cell lineage that is passed down through the gametes before it is modified by somatic recombination or maturation.

germ line

(jĕrm līn)
A collection of haploid cells derived from the specialized cells of the primitive gonad.

germ line

1. The lineage of cells leading to the contemporary GERM CELLS.
2. Often used loosely to refer to the cells of the ovary and testes that give rise, respectively, to the ova and spermatozoa, and to the ova and spermatozoa themselves.

germ line

a group of cells that give rise to the GONADS, becoming differentiated from the ‘somatic’ cells early in embryonic development. Only germ-line cells have the potential to undergo MEIOSIS, and a MUTATION event in these cells may well be transmitted to the offspring, unlike genetic change in somatic cells (see SOMATIC MUTATION).

germ

1. old-fashioned and lay term for a pathogenic microorganism.
2. living substance capable of developing into an organ, part or organism as a whole; a primordium. Commonly used to refer to the embryos of wheat grains which are removed during milling and sold separately as wheat germ.

germ cell
direct descendants of the primordial cells which originate from the yolk sac endoderm and migrate to the gonadal ridges of the embryo, where they give rise to either ova or spermatozoa. Called also gonocytes, sex cells.
germ cell tumor
a rare tumor in dogs, similar to more common lesions in humans. Similar to pituitary adenomas in distribution and cellular characteristics.
germ line
the genetic material as it is transferred via the gametes, before being modified by somatic recombination or mutation.
germ line cells
gametes.
germ line transmission
a mode of transmission, particularly of retroviruses, whereby the genome of the virus is integrated into the chromosomal DNA and transmitted via gametes to offspring.
germ plasma evaluation program
a planned investigative, large scale breeding program aimed at accumulating comparative information on the relative performance of various breeds and crossbreeds of agricultural animals.
germ theory
1. all organisms are developed from a cell.
2. infectious diseases are of microbial origin.
germ tube
a tube-like structure that develops during the growth of some fungi and becomes a hypha; a feature of the yeast, Candida albicans.
wheat germ
see wheat germ.
References in periodicals archive ?
The mindless sprouting of new germ lines from old from then until now, means that at the deepest chemical level of analysis, all life from its beginnings until now, has been DNA's way of making more DNA.
The DNA that succeeds in traveling from the egg and sperm of one generation to the egg and sperm of the next is called the germ line of the species.
So if one wanted to seek souls in physical materials, then the germ line of our species--all the particular versions of DNA containing the instructions for the initial forms and behaviors of each of us and each of our children--would certainly be an interesting starting place.
Once that happens, each subpopulation's germ line is free to follow its own future of subsequent natural selection, and so we may say each has become the germ line of a new species.
A tree-living ancestral primate's DNA survives in our germ line through these traits, which we share with all the other primate species that shared this ancestor: gibbons, orangutans, gorillas, and chimps.
Let me put that into my own words: the germ line of last ancestor common to chimps, gorillas and humans disappeared tens of millions of years ago.
Our germ line builds individuals capable of speech, language, abstraction, revelation, ritual and finally the Sh'ma.
Several XX/XY male phenotypic dispermic chimeras have been recorded as sexually normal by having children (Tippet, 1984), but there is yet no study that analyzes the possible activation of both germ lines in the gonads, or the genetic constituen ts of the offspring in fertile cases.
Studies of human syndromes in offspring have shown that somatic mutations of the germ line may occur in phenotypically normal parents (Hall, 1988).
Phenotypically expressed entities can serve as "incubators" for the germ line of other conspecific entities.
Evidence for this conclusion comes from the empirical generality that the vast majority of the heterogeneity in mtDNA genotypes is distributed among rather than within individuals [implying relative mtDNA population bottlenecks in germ lines (Chapman et al.
One possibility is that mtDNA molecules might occasionally undergo (nonmeiotic) recombination or gene conversion within the germ line, perhaps in such a way that damage-free mtDNA templates correct faulty ones.