psychiatry

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Related to geriatric psychiatry: Geriatric Depression Scale

psychiatry

 [si-ki´ah-tre]
the branch of health science that deals with the study, treatment, and prevention of mental disorders. adj., adj psychiat´ric.
biological psychiatry that which emphasizes biochemical, pharmacological, and neurological causes and treatment approaches.
community psychiatry the branch of psychiatry concerned with the detection, prevention, and treatment of mental disorders in a designated geographical area, with emphasis on environmental factors.
descriptive psychiatry psychiatry based on the study of observable symptoms and behavioral phenomena, rather than underlying psychodynamic processes.
dynamic psychiatry psychiatry based on the study of the mental mechanisms and emotional processes that govern and motivate human behavior, rather than observable behavioral phenomena.
forensic psychiatry that dealing with the legal aspects of mental disorders.
geriatric psychiatry geropsychiatry.
preventive psychiatry a broad term referring to the amelioration, control, and limitation of psychiatric disability.
social psychiatry that concerned with the cultural and social factors that engender, precipitate, intensify, or prolong maladaptive patterns of behavior and complicate treatment.

psy·chi·a·try

(sī-kī'ă-trē),
1. The medical specialty concerned with the diagnosis and treatment of mental disorders.
2. For some types of psychiatry not listed below, see also subentries under therapy, psychotherapy, psychoanalysis.
Synonym(s): psychiatrics
[psych- + G. iatreia, medical treatment]

psychiatry

/psy·chi·a·try/ (si-ki´ah-tre) the branch of medicine dealing with the study, treatment, and prevention of mental disorders.psychiat´ric
biological psychiatry  that which emphasizes physical, chemical, and neurological causes and treatment approaches.
community psychiatry  that concerned with the detection, prevention, and treatment of mental disorders as they develop within designated psychosocial, cultural, or geographical areas.
descriptive psychiatry  that based on the study of observable symptoms and behavioral phenomena, rather than underlying psychodynamic processes.
dynamic psychiatry  that based on the study of emotional processes, their origins, and the mental mechanisms underlying them, rather than observable behavioral phenomena.
forensic psychiatry  that dealing with the legal aspects of mental disorders.
geriatric psychiatry  geropsychiatry.
preventive psychiatry  that broadly concerned with the amelioration, control, and limitation of psychiatric disability.
social psychiatry  that concerned with the cultural and social factors that engender, precipitate, intensify, or prolong maladaptive patterns of behavior and complicate treatment.

psychiatry

(sĭ-kī′ə-trē, sī-)
n.
The branch of medicine that deals with the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of mental and emotional disorders.

psy′chi·at′ric (sī′kē-ăt′rĭk), psy′chi·at′ri·cal (-rĭ-kəl) adj.
psy′chi·at′ri·cal·ly adv.

psychiatry

[sīkī′ətrē]
Etymology: Gk, psyche + iatreia, treatment
the branch of medical science that deals with the causes, treatment, and prevention of mental, emotional, and behavioral disorders. Some kinds of psychiatry are community psychiatry, descriptive psychiatry, dynamic psychiatry, existential psychiatry, forensic psychiatry, and orthopsychiatry. psychiatric, adj.

psychiatry

The medical specialty concerned with physical and chemical interactions in the brain and how they affect mental and emotional processes; the study, treatment, and prevention of mental illness. See Consultation-liaison psychiatry, Forensic psychiatry, Geriatric psychiatry, Neuropsychiatry, Orthomolecular psychiatry, Orthopsychiatry.

psy·chi·a·try

(sī-kī'ă-trē)
The medical specialty concerned with the diagnosis and treatment of mental disorders.
[psych- + G. iatreia, medical treatment]

psychiatry

The branch of medicine concerned with the management of mental illness and emotional and behavioural problems. Compare PSYCHOLOGY.

psychiatry (sīˈ·kīˑ··trē),

n the modern medical specialty that focuses on understanding; diagnosing; and treating emotional, mental, and behavioral dysfunctions or disorders.

psy·chi·a·try

, psychiatrics (sī-kī'ă-trē, sīkē-atriks)
Medical specialty concerned with diagnosis and treatment of mental disorders.
[psych- + G. iatreia, medical treatment]

psychiatry,

n the branch of medical science that deals with the causes, treatment, and prevention of mental, emotional, and behavioral disorders.
References in periodicals archive ?
Results: One of the very first geriatric psychiatry services in Canada was founded in 1978 at the Institut universitaire en sante mentale de Montreal, with a dedicated inpatient unit for new admissions of elderly psychiatric patients.
Geriatric mental health service research: Strategic plan for an aging population: Report of the Health Services Work Group of the American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry.
The study, published in the June issue of the American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, centered on ages 35 to 69.
Eric Weintraub said at the annual meeting of the American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry.
Anderson is board certified in general psychology and subspecialties geriatric psychiatry and forensic psychiatry and has served as the chair of the Communications and Marketing Committee of the American Association for Geriatric Psychology.
Grossberg, director of geriatric psychiatry at Saint Louis (Mo.
Benzodiazepine and related drug use is associated with a 40 percent increase in mortality among people with Alzheimer's disease, according to a new study (International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, Nov.
Tzung-Jeng Hwang is currently the President of the Taiwanese Society of Geriatric Psychiatry and the Director and Associate Professor of the Division of General/Geriatric Psychiatry of the National Taiwan University Hospital.
A maintenance area with 145 beds for neurology, psychiatry, geriatric psychiatry and palliative care as well as a
The current study, published online April 12 in the American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, included 100 people, ages 80 to 99, with varying degrees of hearing loss.
Reynolds III said at the annual meeting of the American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry.

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