geophagy


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geophagia

 [je″o-fa´jah]
the habit of eating clay or earth, a form of pica.

geophagy

(jē-ŏf′ə-jē)
n.
The eating of earthy substances, such as clay or chalk, practiced among various peoples as a custom or for dietary or subsistence reasons.

ge·oph′a·gism n.
ge·oph′a·gist n.
The consumption of dirt—e.g., mud or clay—a former practice in many cultures, regionally extant in the southern US

geophagy

Clay-eating The consumption of dirt–eg, mud or clay, a former practice in many cultures, regionally extant in the southern US

ge·o·pha·gi·a

, geophagism , geophagy (jē'ŏ-fā'jē-ă, jē-of'ă-jizm, -of'ă-jē)
The practice of eating dirt or clay.
Synonym(s): dirt-eating.
[geo- + G. phagō, to eat]

ge·o·pha·gi·a

, geophagism , geophagy (jē'ŏ-fā'jē-ă, jē-of'ă-jizm, -of'ă-jē)
Eating dirt or clay.
[geo- + G. phagō, to eat]
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References in periodicals archive ?
2008) and high calcium and iron lev els were suspected to be part of the reason that Cassowaries engaged in geophagy in New Guinea (Symes et al.
Iron nutrition and possible lead toxicity: An appraisal of geophagy undertaken by pregnant women of UK Asian communities.
Krishnamani R and WC Mahaney Geophagy among primates: adaptive significance and ecological consequences.
Several studies on vertebrate geophagy have found seasonal variation in the use of mineral licks (Jones and Hanson, 1985; Atwood and Weeks, 2003).
Wenzel Geissler, "The Significance of Earth-Eating: Social and Cultural Aspects of Geophagy Among Luo Children," Africa 70 (2000): 668-69.
Browman DL, Gundersen JN (1993) Altiplano coinestible earths: pre-historic and historic geophagy of highland Peru and Bolivia.
They include maggots, leeches (a type of segmented worm), and even geophagy or dirt-eating (see sidebar, p.
Earth eating, or geophagy, in one form or another, has been widespread since the dawn of humanity because most minerals essential for our lives--calcium, magnesium, potassium, zinc, iron, selenium, cobalt, sodium, and others-derive from the earth.
But she says evidence from an X-ray crystallography study and documentation of human soil eating--a practice known as geophagy -- indicates that, in addition to its nutritional benefits, the primate penchant for soil may have a more medicinal function.
This apparent paradox is because the iron being consumed is predominantly in the nonhaem form, which is poorly absorbed, and some of this non-haem iron is from contamination of food with iron from soil, dust, and water; iron leaching into food during storage and cooking; contamination during food processing, such as milling; and the practice of geophagy (14,36).
Browman DL, Gundersen JN (1993) Altiplano comestible earths: pre-historic and historic geophagy of highland Peru and Bolivia.
scientists consider animal geophagy "normal," probably because