geophagy


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geophagia

 [je″o-fa´jah]
the habit of eating clay or earth, a form of pica.

geophagy

(jē-ŏf′ə-jē)
n.
The eating of earthy substances, such as clay or chalk, practiced among various peoples as a custom or for dietary or subsistence reasons.

ge·oph′a·gism n.
ge·oph′a·gist n.
The consumption of dirt—e.g., mud or clay—a former practice in many cultures, regionally extant in the southern US

geophagy

Clay-eating The consumption of dirt–eg, mud or clay, a former practice in many cultures, regionally extant in the southern US

ge·o·pha·gi·a

, geophagism , geophagy (jē'ŏ-fā'jē-ă, jē-of'ă-jizm, -of'ă-jē)
The practice of eating dirt or clay.
Synonym(s): dirt-eating.
[geo- + G. phagō, to eat]

ge·o·pha·gi·a

, geophagism , geophagy (jē'ŏ-fā'jē-ă, jē-of'ă-jizm, -of'ă-jē)
Eating dirt or clay.
[geo- + G. phagō, to eat]
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References in periodicals archive ?
Thus, the geophagy by Yellow-chevroned Parakeet is not likely related to gastric pH buffering, as suggested in some primates (Mahaney et al.
Since scraping of termite nests occurs during the breeding season, geophagy may supply macronutrients to egg formation and embryo development.
Iron nutrition and possible lead toxicity: An appraisal of geophagy undertaken by pregnant women of UK Asian communities.
One exception is John LeConte, "Observations on Geophagy," Southern Medical and Surgical Journal 1 (Aug.
Gilardi kept at it until he did find an explanation for the parrots' geophagy.
The similarities in behavior observed across these localities suggest that generalizations discussed here may apply to avian aggregations at many geophagy sites.
Animals approaching geophagy sites are normally wary (Izawa 1993).
The concentrations of Ca, P, K, Mg, Fe, Zn, and Cu in crop contents were significantly greater than in geophagy soils (P < .
agrees on one cause of geophagy, inadvertent consumption of air-,
It therefore follows that the practice of geophagy could have arrived on Australia's shores with the initial arrivals, at least 40,000 years ago.
The book examines thousands of myths and facts about food, ranging from the true ingredients ofbird's nest soup to the practice of geophagy, or eating earth.
Geophagy is known primarily in herbivorous vertebrates including many ungulates, primates, elephants, reptiles, and a great diversity of birds (Emmons and Stark 1979, Jones and Hanson 1985, Izawa 1993).