geochronology

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geochronology

the measurement of time in relation to the age of the earth.
References in periodicals archive ?
Geochronologist Blair Schoene of Princeton University points out that the study includes samples from only before and after the extinction event, but none during the die-off itself.
According to Richard Roberts, a geochronologist at the University of Wollongong, Australia, and biologist Barry Brook, of the University of Adelaide, Australia, "human impact was likely the decisive factor", possibly through hunting of young megafauna.
It's something so extraordinary that it may have been a singular event in Earth's history," comments Willis Hames, a geochronologist at Auburn (Ala.
Bowring, a geochronologist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, offers a way to reconcile the relatively young fossils found within rocks that appear quite old.
Richard Teh-Lung Ku, a geochronologist at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles, directed the new study.
Swisher III, a geochronologist at the Institute of Human Origins in Berkeley, Calif.
Walter, a geochronologist at the Institute of Human Origins in Berkeley, Calif.
People have thought that it was fast, but the timescale was so poorly calibrated that nobody could begin to think about [evolutionary] rates," says geochronologist Samuel A.
4]) is a mineral of great benefit for geochronologists.
In 2006, Bowring and his students made a trip to Meishan, China, a region whose rock formations bear evidence of the end-Permian extinction; geochronologists and paleontologists have flocked to the area to look for clues in its layers of sedimentary rock.
At present, geochronologists split Earth's history into four large eons: Hadean (4600-4000 Ma); Archean (4000-2500 Ma); Proterozoic (2500-541 Ma); and Phanerozoic (541 Mathe present).
In reading this work I wondered how it will be received by different audiences, the cognoscenti of archaeologists, prehistorians, palaeoanthropologists and geochronologists, all with their vested interests, compared with uninitiated lay readers.