gentian violet


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Related to gentian violet: potassium permanganate

gentian

 [jen´shan]
the dried rhizome and roots of Gentiana lutea.
gentian violet an antibacterial, antifungal, and anthelmintic dye, applied topically in the treatment of infections of the skin and mucous membranes associated with gram-positive bacteria and molds and also used to treat banked blood drawn from patients in areas endemic for Chagas' disease, to kill trypanosomes in the blood.

violet

 [vi´o-let]
1. the color produced by the shortest waves of the visible spectrum, beyond indigo, approximately 380 to 420 nm.
2. a dye or stain with this color.
crystal violet (gentian violet) (methyl violet) gentian violet; see under gentian.

gen·tian vi·o·let

(jen'shŭn vī'ō-let),
An unstandardized dye mixture of violet rosanilins: it is also used topically as an antiinfective. See: crystal violet.

gentian violet

n.
A dye used in microscopy as a biological stain and in medicine as a bactericide, fungicide, and anthelmintic.

gentian violet

[jen′shən]
a topical antibacterial and antifungal agent.
indications It is used to treat superficial Candida infections of the skin and vagina. It is also effective against some superficial bacterial infections such as those caused by Staphylococcus.
contraindications Known hypersensitivity to this drug prohibits its use. It is not applied to ulcerative lesions of the face.
adverse effect Permanent discoloration of the skin may occur after topical exposure.

gentian violet

Podiatry A topical antifungal used to manage dermatomycosis. See Gentian.

gen·tian vi·o·let

(jen'shŭn vī'ŏ-lĕt)
An unstandardized dye mixture of violet rosanilins.

gentian violet

A solution of methylrosanilinium chloride, a pigment once widely used as a conspicuous skin application in cases of IMPETIGO but now considered politically incorrect in the Western world and has been replaced by more effective remedies. The drug is on the WHO official list.

gentian violet (jen´shən),

gentian

the dried rhizome and roots of Gentiana lutea; has been used as a bitter tonic.

gentian violet
an antibacterial, antifungal and anthelmintic dye, derived from triphenylmethane; applied topically in the treatment of infections of the skin and mucous membranes associated with gram-positive bacteria and molds, and at one time administered orally for the treatment of pinworm and liver fluke infections in humans. Called also crystal violet, methylrosaniline chloride.
References in periodicals archive ?
To this end, South African researchers designed a randomised controlled trial to assess the efficacy and safety of these interventions relative to the gentian violet 0.
Gentian violet is very messy, and I rarely recommend it.
The effects of hydrocolloid dressing and gentian violet on radiation-induced moist desquamation wound healing.
The FBI Latent Print Units currently use several techniques to process the sticky side of tape: alternate black powder, ash gray powder, gentian violet, and sticky-side powder.
The deceptively simple form of the works and the carelessness with which they appear to have been installed add fragility and precariousness to Cabelo's powerful themes of life and death; the gentian violet itself will slowly fade.
11,12] Since then, gentian violet has been replaced by crystal violet, a pure chemical that is, therefore, less variable.
Naturopathic or nutraceutical anti-Candida dietary supplements such as garlic, Caprylic Acid, Black Walnut, Olive oil, Psyllium husk and seed powder, Pau d'Arco, Molybdenum, Deglycyrrhizinated Licorice (DGL), Glucosamine and N-acetylglucosamine (NAG), Concanavolin A, Manapol, Undecylenic acid, Gentian violet, digestive enzyme supplements, and various homeopathic formulas, among others.
A very mild solution of either chromic acid or gentian violet can be applied to the infected areas.
Topical antifungal agents used were either; clotrimazole/ lidocaine hydrochloride-(Candid eardrops) or Gentian violet.
Those with physician-confirmed omphalitis were treated for 7 days with topical gentian violet or oral cephalexin (as monotherapy) or topical gentian violet and oral cephalexin (combination therapy) at physician discretion, or injectable therapy (procaine penicillin and gentamicin) if clinical signs of sepsis were also present and family refused hospital referral.