gentamicin


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Related to gentamicin: vancomycin

gentamicin

 [jen″tah-mi´sin]
an aminoglycosideantibiotic complex elaborated by bacteria of the genus Micromonospora, effective against many gram-negative bacteria, especially Pseudomonas species, as well as certain gram-positive bacteria, especially Staphylococcus aureus; used as the sulfate salt.

gen·ta·mi·cin

(jen'tă-mī'sin), Avoid the misspelling gentamycin.
A broad spectrum antibiotic of the aminoglycoside class, obtained from Micromonospora purpurea and M. echinospora, which inhibits the growth of both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria; the sulfate salt is used medicinally.

gentamicin

/gen·ta·mi·cin/ (jen″tah-mi´sin) an aminoglycoside antibiotic complex isolated from bacteria of the genus Micromonospora, effective against many gram-negative bacteria as well as certain gram-positive species; used as the sulfate salt.

gentamicin

(jĕn′tə-mī′sĭn)
n.
A broad-spectrum antibiotic derived from an actinomycete of the genus Micromonospora, used in its sulfate form to treat various infections.

gentamicin

Garamycin® Infectious disease A broad-spectrum aminoglycoside antibiotic obtained from Micromonospora purpurea Adverse effects Ototoxicity, nephrotoxicity Therapeutic range Peak 5-10 mg/L; trough < 2 mg/L Toxic range Peak > 10 mg/L; trough > 2 mg/L. See Aminoglycosides.

gen·ta·mi·cin

(jen'tă-mī'sin) Avoid the misspelling gentamycin.
A broad spectrum antibiotic of the aminoglycoside class, which inhibits growth of both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria; sulfate salt is also used medicinally.

gentamicin

An aminoglycoside antibiotic used mainly for the treatment of serious GRAM NEGATIVE infections. Otherwise, gentamicin is used topically for external infections, such as those of the eye or ear. In large dosage it can cause TINNITUS, deafness and kidney damage. Recently, gentamycin has been shown to be capable of bypassing a STOP MUTATION and has been shown to be helpful in controlling CYSTIC FIBROSIS and other genetic disorders caused by stop mutations. The drug is on the WHO official list. Brand names are Cidomycin, Garamycin, Genticin and Minims gentamicin. See also PTC124.

gentamicin

broad-spectrum, aminoglycoside antibiotic; inhibits some Gram-positive, most Gram-negative bacteria and also Pseudomonas aeruginosa ; largely ineffective against anaerobes and haemolytic streptococci; given by injection for severe infections; side-effects include ototoxicity and nephrotoxicity, especially in the elderly

antibiotic 

1. Pertaining to the ability to destroy or inhibit other living organisms.
2. A substance derived from a mould or bacterium, or produced synthetically, that destroys (bactericidal) or inhibits the growth (bacteriostatic) of other microorganisms and is thus used to treat infections. Some substances have a narrow spectrum of activity whereas others act against a wide range of both gram-positive and gram-negative organisms (broad-spectrum antibiotics). Antibiotics can be classified into several groups according to their mode of action on or within bacteria: (1) Drugs inhibiting bacterial cell wall synthesis, such as bacitracin, vancomycin and the β-lactams based agents (e.g. penicillin, cephalosporins (e.g. ceftazidime, ceftriaxone, cefuroxime). (2) Drugs affecting the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane, such as polymyxin B sulfate and gramicidin. (3) Drugs inhibiting bacterial protein synthesis, such as aminoglycosides (e.g. amikacin sulfate, framycetin sulfate, gentamicin, neomycin sulfate and tobramycin), tetracyclines, macrolides (e.g. erythromycin and azithromycin) and chloramphenicol. (4) Drugs inhibiting the intermediate metabolism of bacteria, such as sulfonamides (e.g. sulfacetamide sodium) and trimethoprim. (5) Drugs inhibiting bacterial DNA synthesis, such as nalixidic acid and fluoroquinolones (e.g. ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin, norfloxacin and ofloxacin). (6) Other antibiotics such as fusidic acid, the diamidines, such as propamidine isethionate and dibrompropamidine. Syn. antibacterial. See antiinflammatory drug; fusidic acid.

gen·ta·mi·cin

(jen'tă-mī'sin)
Broad spectrum aminoglycoside antibiotic that inhibits growth of both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria.

gentamicin, gentamycin

an antibiotic complex elaborated by fungi of the genus Micromonospora, effective against many gram-negative bacteria, especially Pseudomonas species, as well as certain gram-positive bacteria, especially Staphylococcus aureus. As with other aminoglycoside antibiotics gentamicin is ototoxic and nephrotoxic. Used as the sulfate.
References in periodicals archive ?
Intravesical gentamicin treatment of recurrent Escherichia coli urinary tract infections in a patient with multiple antibiotic allergies.
A number of methods have been employed to make IT gentamicin application more safer and manageable.
In the search for new strategies to treat staphylococcal infections, the aim of the present study was to explore the in vitro activity of carnosic acid alone and in combination with gentamicin against multidrug-resistant MRSA clinical isolates.
The prototype aminoglycoside gentamicin is among the most frequently used antibiotics against infections by gram negative bacillary microorganisms1, but regrettably its use generates nephrotoxicity in almost 10-20% of the therapeutic regimes2.
Target: intellectual property rights covering next-generation gentamicin derivatives
10 Bang et al showed a 29% decline in the neonatal mortality in rural India by administering home-based oral cotrimoxazole, and intramuscular gentamicin to newborns with sepsis by village health workers.
Experimental and clinical gentamicin toxicity in commercial White Leghorn birds has been reported to produce high mortality and toxicopathological changes in kidneys and liver (Khan et al.
The role of gentamicin in treatment of listeriosis in pregnancy is controversial.
There were 183 children with clinical sepsis during the study period, and 14 (8%) of them were neonates, 121 (66%) infants (1 month to <12 months), and the rest 48 (26%) were older (12 months to 59 months); 70 (38%) had received oral medication at home prior to injectable antibiotics on admission in the hospital; 181 patients had received combination of injection ampicilin and injection gentamicin; and two patients had received the combination of injection ceftriaxone and injection gentamicin as the first-line antibiotics.
Apart from the standard antibiotics, testing was also done specifically for ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, and chloramphenicol, which are available locally as topical ear drops.