genotype

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Related to genotypically: phenotypically

genotype

 [jen″o-tīp]
1. the entire genetic constitution of an individual; also, the alleles present at one or more specific loci.
2. the type species of a genus. adj., adj genotyp´ic.

gen·o·type

(jen'ō-tīp),
1. The genetic constitution of an individual.
2. Gene combination at one specific locus or any specified combination of loci. For specific blood group genotypes, see Blood Groups Appendix.
[G. genos, birth, descent, + typos, type]

genotype

/ge·no·type/ (-tīp)
1. the entire genetic constitution of an individual; also, the alleles present at one or more specific loci.
2. the type species of a genus.genotyp´ic

genotype

(jĕn′ə-tīp′, jē′nə-)
n.
1. The genetic makeup, as distinguished from the physical appearance, of an organism or a group of organisms.
2. The combination of alleles located on homologous chromosomes that determines a specific characteristic or trait.
3. A specific combination of alleles at one or more loci on a chromosome.

gen′o·typ′ic (-tĭp′ĭk), gen′o·typ′i·cal adj.
gen′o·typ′i·cal·ly adv.

genotype

[jē′nōtīp′]
Etymology: Gk, genos, birth, typos, mark
1 the complete genetic constitution of an organism or group, as determined by the specific combination and location of the genes on the chromosomes.
2 the alleles situated at one or more sites on homologous chromosomes. A pair of alleles is usually designated by letters or symbols, such as AA when the alleles are identical and Aa when they are different.
3 a group or class of organisms having the same genetic makeup; the type species of a genus. Compare phenotype. genotypic, adj.

genotype

Genetics The entire genetic makeup of an organism, the type species of a genus, defined by the complement of allelic forms of each gene or genetic markers present in an organism's genome. See Gene, Genetic marker, Nucleus, Phenotype.

gen·o·type

(jē'nō-tīp)
1. The genetic constitution of an individual.
2. Gene combination at one specific locus or any specified combination of loci.
[G. genos, birth, descent, + typos, type]

genotype

1. The total genetic information contained in a cell.
2. The genetic constitution of an individual organism. Compare PHENOTYPE.

genotype

the genetic constitution of an individual, usually referring to specific CHARACTERS under consideration. Thus, the two alleles of the human albino gene can be written A and a , with three possible genotypes: a/a, A/a and A/A. See DOMINANCE (1) for the expression of the genotype in the PHENOTYPE.

genotype

genetic make-up of an individual

genotype (jēˑ·nō·tīp),

n an organism's genetic makeup.

genotype

The complete genetic constitution of an individual at a particular location (locus) in the genome. At many locations (loci) throughout the genome, the chromosomal DNA sequence differs subtly between individuals. Each of the various DNA sequences at one locus is called an allele: for instance, if there are three sequence variants present, then there are three alleles. Offspring inherit one homologous chromosome from each parent. Thus, a genotype comprises two alleles: the allele inherited from the father (carried on the paternal chromosome) and the allele inherited from the mother (carried on the maternal chromosome). See gene; phenotype.

gen·o·type

(jē'nō-tīp)
1. The genetic constitution of an individual.
2. Gene combination at one specific locus or any specified combination of loci.
[G. genos, birth, descent, + typos, type]

genotype (jē´nōtīp),

n the aggregate of ordered genes received by offspring from both parents; e.g., a person with blood group AB is of genotype AB.

genotype

1. the entire genetic constitution of an individual; also, the alleles present at one or more specific loci.
2. the type species of a genus.

genotype frequency
the proportion of the population which have the same genetic constitution.
References in periodicals archive ?
The remaining patients infected with either serotype that appeared to have a common source on the basis of time of onset and locations all had unique DNA fingerprints and were genotypically different.
Wahlstrom and Liberg (1995b) speculated that there could be 2 genotypically distinct morphs of animals, "dispersive" and "stationary", and that the dispersive type dominated along the expansion front because stationary animals had not had time to colonize that region.
The bone marrow donor was her 12-year-old brother, who was genotypically identical to the patient with respect to HLA-A, B, C, and DR but was mismatched with regard to blood type (donor: A Rh-positive; recipient: O Rh-positive.
Thus, "selection theory" alludes generally to the process by which certain variations, genotypically defined in the case of biological evolution, become selected for in a population over time.
consist of complex mixtures of genotypically distinguishable viruses," the researchers say.
Although this study is speculative, it represents promise in a genotypically defined subgroup of patients and an option for personalized medicine in major depression.
As expected, the 3 Tg(HuPrP) mouse lines used for VPSPr transmission easily transmitted sCJD subtypes that were 129 genotypically compatible with the host PrP, indicating that the Tg mice used for VPSPr transmission are competent to propagate classical human prion diseases (Table 3).
Parasites responsible for recurrence of benign tertian malaria are frequently genotypically different (determined by molecular techniques) from those that gave rise to the initial symptomatic bout of disease.
aeruginosa in our study differed markedly both phenotypically and genotypically from those isolated from the internal tubings.
A subset of lung adenocarcinomas and atypical adenomatous hyperplasia-associated foci are genotypically related: an EGFR, HER2, and K-ras mutational analysis.
To achieve the first aim, we used a previously described RNA-single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) strategy (26,27) to genotype ALB mRNA molecules found in the circulation of recipients of liver or bone marrow transplants from donors who were genotypically different for the targeted ALB-coding SNP.
Resistance to HCV inhibitors can be determined genotypically and/or phenotypically.