genome-wide association study


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genome-wide association study

A research study that compares all of the DNA of people affected by an illness with the DNA of matched healthy individuals. Its aim is to identify specific genetic variations that make some people more likely than others to become sick. These variations (mutations) are often minor, consisting of as little as a change in a single nucleotide in a DNA strand.
References in periodicals archive ?
A novel, functional and replicable risk gene region for alcohol dependence identified by genome-wide association study.
Genome-wide association study identifies three loci associated with melanoma risk.
Led by Professor Julie Williams and Professor Mike Owen, at Cardiff's School of Medicine, the study was the largest-ever joint Alzheimer's disease genome-wide association study, involving 16,000 individuals and helped uncover two new genes associated with Alzheimer's disease.
Working with scientists from around the world, Professor Julie Williams, from Cardiff University's School of Medicine in Wales, the UK, was the head scientist for the largest-ever joint Alzheimer's disease genome-wide association study (GWAS).
Genome-wide association study of prostate cancer identifies a second risk locus at 8q24.
In a paper entitled A genome-wide association study identifies two new risk loci for Graves' disease, published in the August 14, 2011 issue of Nature Genetics Magazine, researchers confirmed four previously reported loci and identified two new susceptibility loci for Graves' disease.
A genome-wide association study of production traits in a commercial population of Large White pigs: evidence of haplotypes affecting meat quality.
Second, to perform a genome-wide association study to identify loci underlying contemporary variation in hair form.
A genome-wide association study identifies susceptibility variants for type 2 diabetes in Han Chinese.
The international team performed a genome-wide association study meta-analysis on a total of over 100,000 subjects of European and Asian descent - 29,880 rheumatoid arthritis patients and 73,758 controls - by analysing around 10 million genetic variants called single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs).
The team carried out a genome-wide association study to identify any common gene variants that might correlate with which hand people prefer using.