genetic diseases

(redirected from genetic syndromes)

genetic diseases

; genetic disorders; genetic syndromes autosomal or sex-linked, recessive or dominant conditions, occurring in those who share a common genetic factor or express a common gene (see autosomal-dominant inheritanceandautosomal-recessive inheritance)
References in periodicals archive ?
The team also assessed known inherited genetic syndromes in adult relatives of pediatric cancer patients.
A number of genetic syndromes are associated with a higher incidence of pancreatic carcinoma, but most cases are sporadic.
WORCESTER - A simple blood test done on maternal serum early in the first trimester of pregnancy to determine if a baby has Down syndrome, or Trisomy 13 or Trisomy 18, more severe genetic syndromes, will likely be offered to mothers in Worcester County later this year.
She travels around the country to provide consultations in schools, developing behavioral and educational plans for students with fragile X and other genetic syndromes.
These are used to treat illnesses such as rare forms of cancer, muscle diseases or genetic syndromes.
After a substantial opening chapter overviewing pediatric and adolescent sexuality, chapters cover topics such as genetic syndromes, sexual abuse, breast disorders, and menstrual disorders, in addition to contraception, pregnancy, and abortion, the female athlete, and gynecological aspects of eating disorders.
The problem is identifying genetic syndromes and predicting severe neurodevelopmental delay in these fetuses.
Genetic syndromes are: familial atypical multiple malignant melanoma (FAMMM); Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS); BRCA1 and BRCA2 germ-line mutations in breast and ovarian hereditary cancer syndromes; hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer; familial adenomatous polyposis; and Li-Fraumeni syndrome [3-4].
Pancreatic Cancer-Associated Genetic Syndromes Pancreatic Cancer Risk, Genetic Syndrome Gene(s) -fold Hereditary breast and BRCA2 BRCA1 3.
Traditionally, clinical genetics has been a largely pediatric-based discipline focused on genetic syndromes, the vast majority of which are quite rare.
2) Several potential causal factors have been identified, including genetic syndromes, gene-environment interactions, and prenatal maternal exposures such as medication, alcohol, smoking, occupational and environmental toxins, and in utero nutritional deficiencies.