genetic screening


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genetic screening

n.
The analysis of DNA samples to detect the presence of a gene or genes associated with an inherited disorder.

genetic screening

the process of investigating a specific population of persons for the purpose of detecting the presence of disease, either incipient or overt, such as the generalized screening of all newborns for phenylketonuria. Genetic screening may be used to identify those who possess defective genes, gain information concerning the incidence of a disorder in the population, and provide reproductive information, specifically to those at risk, such as the close relatives of persons affected with inborn errors of metabolism or those in certain ethnic groups who have a high incidence of a particular disease, specifically sickle cell anemia in African-Americans and Tay-Sachs disease in Ashkenazic Jews. When accompanied by education and counseling, mass screening programs can be effective in the management of genetic disorders. See also genetic counseling.
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Genetic screening

genetic screening

Molecular diagnostics The screening of a person's serum for molecular markers that indicate an ↑ susceptibility to inherited or acquired diseases with a genetic component GS candidates Cystic fibrosis, PKU, sickle cell disease, Tay-Sachs disease

fa·mil·i·al screen·ing

(fă-mil'ē-ăl skrēn'ing)
Examination directed at close relatives of probands with diseases that may lie latent, as in age-dependent dominant traits, or that may involve risk to progeny, as in X-linked traits.

genetic screening

The use of AMNIOCENTESIS or CHORIONIC VILLUS SAMPLING before birth to obtain fetal cells or a small portion of fetal tissue on which chromosomal, and to some extent gene, studies can be made. A number of serious genetic disorders can, in this way, be diagnosed at a very early stage after conception so that the option of terminating the pregnancy can be considered.
References in periodicals archive ?
We believe that genetic screening makes the puppies more valuable.
Watson having classic Cockayne's syndrome is much less than 1%, so finding ho mozygous changes to his ERCC6 gene via genetic screening does not significantly change the disease probability.
Although quality of life continues to improve for people with Down syndrome, government policy requires that genetic screening is offered to all pregnant women, posing risks to up to 700,000 pregnancies each year.
Screening and Counseling for Genetic Conditions: A Report on the Ethical, Social, and Legal Implications of Genetic Screening, Counseling, and Education Programs.
Genetic screening to prevent abacavir hypersensitivity reaction: Are we there yet?
Ethics and Newborn Genetic Screening is a jarring challenge to the momentum of prevailing practice and legislation.
The study showed that genetic screening for Lynch syndrome, which can be accomplished with Myriad Genetic's COLARIS(R) test, is as cost-effective as other widely accepted cancer procedures in the general population such as colorectal cancer screening (colonoscopy), cervical cancer screening (Pap smear), and breast cancer screening (mammography).
LIVERPOOL is bidding to become the first centre outside London to offer genetic screening of early-stage foetuses.
Lea Sevcik, assistant director of the Catholic Organization for Life and Family (COLF), writes that Health Canada has asked for public input on the extent to which genetic screening of embryos should be allowed in Canada.
Today, they can use genetic screening technologies to weed out embryos with undesirable defects, the gene that causes cystic fibrosis, for example, or fragile X, which leads to severe retardation.
In the future, it is hoped that genetic screening will be used to diagnose a wide range of diseases, including cancer and heart disease.