genetic screening


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genetic screening

n.
The analysis of DNA samples to detect the presence of a gene or genes associated with an inherited disorder.

genetic screening

the process of investigating a specific population of persons for the purpose of detecting the presence of disease, either incipient or overt, such as the generalized screening of all newborns for phenylketonuria. Genetic screening may be used to identify those who possess defective genes, gain information concerning the incidence of a disorder in the population, and provide reproductive information, specifically to those at risk, such as the close relatives of persons affected with inborn errors of metabolism or those in certain ethnic groups who have a high incidence of a particular disease, specifically sickle cell anemia in African-Americans and Tay-Sachs disease in Ashkenazic Jews. When accompanied by education and counseling, mass screening programs can be effective in the management of genetic disorders. See also genetic counseling.
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Genetic screening

genetic screening

Molecular diagnostics The screening of a person's serum for molecular markers that indicate an ↑ susceptibility to inherited or acquired diseases with a genetic component GS candidates Cystic fibrosis, PKU, sickle cell disease, Tay-Sachs disease

fa·mil·i·al screen·ing

(fă-mil'ē-ăl skrēn'ing)
Examination directed at close relatives of probands with diseases that may lie latent, as in age-dependent dominant traits, or that may involve risk to progeny, as in X-linked traits.

genetic screening

The use of AMNIOCENTESIS or CHORIONIC VILLUS SAMPLING before birth to obtain fetal cells or a small portion of fetal tissue on which chromosomal, and to some extent gene, studies can be made. A number of serious genetic disorders can, in this way, be diagnosed at a very early stage after conception so that the option of terminating the pregnancy can be considered.
References in periodicals archive ?
Watson having classic Cockayne's syndrome is much less than 1%, so finding ho mozygous changes to his ERCC6 gene via genetic screening does not significantly change the disease probability.
Screening and Counseling for Genetic Conditions: A Report on the Ethical, Social, and Legal Implications of Genetic Screening, Counseling, and Education Programs.
Genetic screening to prevent abacavir hypersensitivity reaction: Are we there yet?
Writes the Assistant Director: "Without a ban on the use of genetic screening, the futuristic movie Gattaca is a fitting warning of what we may be in for.
Genetic screening for thalassaemia - a blood disorder common in Asian and Mediter- ranean populations - and sickle cell anaemia, among African and Caribbean people, could be among the first mass-testing programmes to be rolled out.
The findings have already triggered genetic screening to identify which patients might benefit from the drug.
An overview of genetic risk and genetic screening is provided to give the nurse a better understanding of this important field of patient care.
The move comes after pressure from parents who want to use IVF and genetic screening to create babies whose umbilical cord blood could save the life of a sibling.
The move follows pressure from parents who want to use IVF and genetic screening to create babies whose umbilical cord blood could save the life of a sibling.
Supporters of genetic screening believe the plan would give people vital infor-mation about potential problems which may affect them in the future.
Stolen secrets are often customer information or computer source codes and software, though sometimes it's as exotic as genetic screening discoveries or a DNA cell line.
Because of his strikingly original thinking on animal rights, genetic screening, and other issues, Peter Singer has become a controversial philosopher even among humanists.