risk

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risk

 [risk]
a danger or hazard; the probability of suffering harm.
attributable risk the amount or proportion of incidence of disease or death (or risk of disease or death) in individuals exposed to a specific risk factor that can be attributed to exposure to that factor; the difference in the risk for unexposed versus exposed individuals.
empiric risk the probability that a trait will occur or recur in a family based solely on experience rather than on knowledge of the causative mechanism. See also genetic risk.
genetic risk the probability that a trait will occur or recur in a family, based on knowledge of its genetic pattern of transmission. See also empiric risk.
relative risk for a disease, death, or other outcome, the ratio of the incidence rate among individuals with a given risk factor to the incidence rate among those without it.

risk

(risk), In idiomatic English one is at risk of, not for, a disease, injury, or other untoward event. Avoid redundant phrases such a possible risk and potential risk; an element of uncertainty is inherent in the meaning of the word.
The probability that an event will occur.

risk

(rĭsk)
n.
The possibility of suffering harm or loss; danger.

risk′er n.

risk

EBM
In clinical trials, a term referring to the possibility of harm or discomfort for study participants.

risk

Epidemiology The chance or likelihood that an undesirable event or effect will occur, as a result of use or nonuse, incidence, or influence of a chemical, physical, or biologic agent, especially during a stated period; the probability of developing a given disease over a specified time period. See Minimal risk Managed care The chance or possibility of loss. See Risk sharing Occupational medicine A value determined by the potential severity of the hazard and the frequency of exposure to the 'risky' substance or activity, usually understood to mean the probability of suffering from a particular disease Risk assessment The probability that something will cause injury, combined with the potential severity of that injury. See Absolute risk, Acceptable risk, Assigned risk, Attributable risk, Cancer risk, Cardiac risk, Dread risk, Hazard risk rating, High risk/high impact, Incremental risk, Lifetime risk, No significant risk, Nonattributable risk, Thick conception of risk, Thin conception of risk, Unknown risk.
Risks of disease
Infection
HBV  1:63,000
HCV 1:103,000
HIV 1:493,000
HTLV I/II 1:641,000
HAV  1:1,000,000
Other morbid conditions
MVA 1:6,700
Flood 1:450,000
Earthquake 1:600,000
Lightning 1:1,000,000

risk

(risk)
1. The probability that an event will occur.
2. The possibility of adverse consequences.

risk

reasoned judgement of the likelihood of, and/or effects of, adverse events occurring, in relation to clinical practice or work environment

risk,

n the possible peril related to a particular condition or treatment. The risk may come directly from the condition itself or indirectly from the process or method involved in the treatment application.

risk

(risk)
Probability that an event will occur.

risk

the chance of an unfavorable event occurring.

acceptable risk
risk for which the benefits rank larger than the potential hazards.
at risk
that part of a total population which is subject to the disease being reviewed, e.g. only milking cows are at risk to milk fever, only grazing cows to enzootic nasal granuloma.
risk aversion
reluctance to take risks.
risk factor
an attribute or exposure which increases the probability of occurrence of a disease or other outcome.
risk premium
the amount of money required to convince a person to take a specific risk.
risk ratio
the ratio of two risks.
relative risk
see relative risk.
specified risk materials
a term used in the US to denote tissues that can be infected with the agent of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), namely brain and spinal cord, spinal ganglia, retina, and terminal small intestine. Banned from inclusion in any feed stuff.
surgical risk
an animal that has poor general health and must be assessed as a poor survival risk to undergo major surgery or anesthesia.
References in periodicals archive ?
By contrast, intake of artificially sweetened beverages had no effect on the association between genetic risk score and BMI.
today announced a medical education program designed to improve physicians' understanding of genetic risk factors for disease, the current evidence about the use of genomic tools and technologies to determine risk, and promising practices for utilizing those tools to aid in disease prevention.
Most breast programs only will offer genetic risk screening after a woman is diagnosed with breast cancer.
Using an innovative trial design, the two treatments will be given in cognitively healthy people at genetic risk of developing the build-up of amyloid protein in the brain that may eventually lead to AD.
Although these protective effects were observed in the entire study population, regardless of their sex or genetic risk factors, they were particularly strong among overweight and obese individuals.
Genome-wide association (GWA) studies analyze "hundreds of thousands of genetic variants for thousands of patients and controls" to identify genetic risk factors, he said.
Arguably, someone denied a promotion because of a genetic risk factor would be regarded as disabled by the employer and therefore covered under the ADA.
In other news, another study suggests that the brains of people with a genetic risk for Alzheimer's have to work harder than normal to perform simple memory tasks long before any outward symptoms of the disease develop.
INFOGEN provides to the patient for a subscription fee a personal genetic risk profile for a given medical condition and, if the patient so wishes, to his or her personal physician.
One surprising result was that men whose genetic risk for prostate cancer was found to be lower than that of the general population, and who also had normal laboratory and physical screening results for the disease, were significantly less stressed about the disease than the control group.
June 3, 2015 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Five researchers each received a two-year, $200,000 grant from the National Psoriasis Foundation for their work to improve treatments for psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis, determine genetic risk factors and find new ways to manage psoriatic disease.
They created polygenic risk scores a 'composite' score of genetic effects that forms an index of genetic risk of ADHD for 8,229 ALSPAC participants.

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