genetic marker


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genetic

 [jĕ-net´ik]
1. pertaining to reproduction or to birth or origin.
2. inherited.
genetic code the arrangement of nucleotides in the polynucleotide chain of a chromosome; it governs the transmission of genetic information to proteins, i.e., determines the sequence of amino acids in the polypeptide chain making up each protein synthesized by the cell. Genetic information is coded in DNA by means of four bases: two purines (adenine and guanine) and two pyrimidines (thymine and cystosine). Each adjacent sequence of three bases (a codon) determines the insertion of a specific amino acid. In RNA, uracil replaces thymine.
genetic map
1. the location of mutations along the length of a chromosome, as determined by recombination experiments. The unit of length is the centimorgan (cM), one crossover per meiosis.
2. the sequence of base pairs along the DNA of a chromosome, a technique being applied to humans.
A gene map of Chromosome 18. From Copstead, 1996.
genetic marker a gene having alleles that are all expressed in the phenotype, that is, they are codominant, and which can be used to study inheritance. The various blood group systems and serum or red blood cell proteins easily detected by electrophoresis or immunodiffusion are commonly used markers.

ge·net·ic de·ter·mi·nant

any antigenic determinant or identifying characteristic, particularly those of allotypes.
Synonym(s): genetic marker

genetic marker

n.
A gene, DNA sequence, or gene product whose inheritance can be traced through a pedigree or phylogeny. Genetic markers are used in paternity testing, studies of evolution, and evaluating genetic contributions to phenotypes including disease. Genetic markers associated with certain diseases can often be detected in the blood serum, where their presence is used to determine whether a person is at high risk for developing a disease.

genetic marker

any specific gene that produces a readily recognizable genetic trait that can be used in family and population studies or in linkage analysis. Also called gene marker, marker gene.

ge·net·ic de·ter·mi·nant

(jĕ-net'ik dĕ-tĕr'mi-nănt)
Any antigenic determinant or identifying characteristic, particularly those of allotypes.

genetic marker

A gene or DNA sequence that indicates the presence of a disease or a probable risk of developing it.

genetic marker

  1. a phenotypic character that can be assigned to a GENE to mark its position on the GENOME.
  2. a characteristic feature of the GENOTYPE, such as a NUCLEOTIDE signature, gene or HETEROCHROMATIC region, that can be used to track a particular individual, TISSUE, CELL, NUCLEUS, CHROMOSOME, PLASMID or gene. Genetic markers are used, for example, to detect the presence of cloning VECTORS in GENETIC ENGINEERING and to monitor ORGANISMS released into the environment. See RESTRICTION FRAGMENT LENGTH POLYMORPHISM.

genetic marker,

n a specific gene that produces a readily recognizable genetic trait that can be used in family and population studies or in linkage analysis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Large scale studies like this one, with well-characterized samples from carefully selected patients allow the identification of genetic markers for risk of early-onset MI, which could potentially be incorporated into individual risk assessment protocols," said Stephen G.
To confirm that the KRAS-variant was a genetic marker of ovarian cancer risk, Weidhaas and co-senior author Frank Slack studied women with ovarian cancer who also had evidence of a hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome.
The second advance was the development of abundant genetic markers rapidly typable by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) (termed microsatellites), which amplified polymorphisms in simple sequence length repeats such as [CA]n (Figure) (18).
The researchers also looked at single DNA variations in the patients and identified a genetic marker linked to elevated tau levels.
Therefore, screening for the second genetic marker, PCA3, is included in the urine test.
White women with the genetic marker were nearly 70 percent more likely to have breast cancer compared to those without the marker, the study found.
In the study, white women with the genetic marker were nearly 70 percent more likely to have breast cancercompared to those without the marker.
A NEW genetic marker has been found that can identify women at risk of inherited ovarian cancer.
But the choice of an appropriate genetic marker and the statistical methodology is essential to get the best results.
I'm interested in knowing if a genetic marker has been identified and if a test is available.
The Edinburgh University team found a genetic marker is associated with an increased risk of colon cancer in Europeans but not in the Japanese population.
By tracing genetic markers from both the mild bees and the killers, researchers linked high stinging fury to particular genetic regions.