genetic map


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Related to genetic map: Linkage map

genetic

 [jĕ-net´ik]
1. pertaining to reproduction or to birth or origin.
2. inherited.
genetic code the arrangement of nucleotides in the polynucleotide chain of a chromosome; it governs the transmission of genetic information to proteins, i.e., determines the sequence of amino acids in the polypeptide chain making up each protein synthesized by the cell. Genetic information is coded in DNA by means of four bases: two purines (adenine and guanine) and two pyrimidines (thymine and cystosine). Each adjacent sequence of three bases (a codon) determines the insertion of a specific amino acid. In RNA, uracil replaces thymine.
genetic map
1. the location of mutations along the length of a chromosome, as determined by recombination experiments. The unit of length is the centimorgan (cM), one crossover per meiosis.
2. the sequence of base pairs along the DNA of a chromosome, a technique being applied to humans.
A gene map of Chromosome 18. From Copstead, 1996.
genetic marker a gene having alleles that are all expressed in the phenotype, that is, they are codominant, and which can be used to study inheritance. The various blood group systems and serum or red blood cell proteins easily detected by electrophoresis or immunodiffusion are commonly used markers.

ge·net·ic map

an abstract representation of the ordered array of genetic loci such that the interval between entries has algebraic signs and magnitude proportional to the expected number of crossings over between them and distances are algebraically additive; for example, on a genetic map the combined distance between locus A and locus C is the algebraic sum of the two distances between loci A and B, and B and C.

genetic map

n.
A graphic representation of the arrangement of genes or DNA sequences on a chromosome. Also called gene map.

genetic map

the graphic representation of the linear arrangement of genes on a chromosome and the relative distances between them, in map units or morgans. Also called linkage map.

genetic map

(1) Chromosome map, see there.  
(2) Linkage map, see there.

ge·net·ic map

(jĕ-net'ik map)
An abstract representation of the ordered array of genetic loci such that the interval between entries has algebraic signs and magnitude proportional to the expected number of crossings over between them and distances are algebraically additive; e.g., on a genetic map the combined distance between locus A and locus C is the algebraic sum of the two distances between loci A and B, and B and C.

genetic map

see CHROMOSOME MAP.

genetic

1. pertaining to reproduction or to birth or origin.
2. inherited.

genetic abnormality
inherited defect, which may or may not be congenital.
genetic analysis
analysis of breeding and pedigree records to establish degrees of relationship between single animals and groups of animals. Segregation analysis with full-sibling families is an obvious technique.
genetic code
the manner in which the arrangement of nucleotides in the polynucleotide chain of a chromosome governs the transmission of genetic information to proteins, i.e. determines the sequence of amino acids in the polypeptide chain making up each protein synthesized by the cell. Genetic information is coded in DNA by means of four bases (two purines: adenine and guanine; and two pyrimidines: thymine and cystosine). Each adjacent sequence of three bases (a codon) determines which of the 20 amino acids will be inserted into the nascent polypeptide.
genetic complementation
genetic control of inherited disease
consists of preventing carrier animals from contributing their genes to succeeding generations of the population of which they are members.
genetic correlation
a change in an unselected character resulting from selection of another character during a breeding program.
genetic defects
defects of function or structure passed on from parents to offspring. Inherited defects.
genetic determination
see broad-sense heritability.
genetic disease resistance
inherited resistance to diseases caused by non-hereditary risk factors.
genetic dominance
see dominance (2).
genetic drift
see antigenic drift.
genetic engineering
the manipulation of genes by recombinant DNA technologies to produce chromosomal combinations that are unlikely to occur by natural means, for example the introduction of genes for insulin into a yeast cell which then produces insulin which can be purified and used as a therapeutic substance. See also recombinant DNA technology.
genetic etiology
disease caused by inheritance of specific disease without the intervention of other risk factors; established by strongly positive relationship in terms of genes held in common between the affected patient and other affected individuals.
genetic evaluation
assessment, for predictive purposes, of productive improvement or conformational characteristics, of the gain to be derived by the use of the animal in question in a breeding program.
genetic expressivity
genetic heterogeneity
demonstrated by the way in which more than one disease with identical clinical signs can be inherited.
genetic immunization
use of a cloned genetically engineered gene with an encoded antigen to immunize the host against that antigen. See also DNA vaccine.
genetic map
the linear arrangement of genes along a chromosome. Called also linkage map.
genetic merit
inherited productivity or performance qualities.
mobile genetic elements
see transposable genetic elements (below).
genetic penetrance
genetic production potential
inherited productivity but still influenced by environmental risk factors.
genetic resistance
genetically determined resistance to specified infectious agents.
genetic selection
selection of animals as breeding stock on the basis of known inherited characteristics.
transposable genetic elements
pieces of DNA varying in length from a few hundred to tens of thousands of base pairs found in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells that move from place to place in the chromosomes of a single cell; some are viruses. Called also mobile genetic elements or transposons.
genetic variance
that portion of the phenotypic variance of a trait in a population which can be attributed to genetic difference amongst individuals.
References in periodicals archive ?
Detecting marker-QTL linkage and estimating QTL gene effect and map location using a saturated genetic map.
The DNA microarray technique allowed for the construction of an upland rice genetic map with broad genome coverage and a total length of 1,424 cM, covering all chromosomes of the species.
A comprehensive genetic map of the human genome based on 5264 microsatellites.
For the future work, we'll try to improve the performance of the biological model through the genetic map.
Anchoring FPCs on the IBM Genetic Map The 311 maize unigenes genotyped in this study were mapped relative to a framework of 247 genetic markers evenly distributed across the 10 maize chromosomes, thus totaling 558 markers (Fig.
A genetic map in the Mirnulus gurtarus species complex reveals transmission ratio distortion due to heterospecific interactions.
Pendulum a reference genetic map was recently developed (Moulin et al.
Simulation of population from different types (derivatives from controlled crosses or exogamic) with different size to establish the optimum value to study the mapping and compare the methodological efficacy in the establishment of the genetic map and procedures to detect the QTLs;
SCIENTISTS in Wales and the United States have teamed up to complete the first genetic map of a bio-fuel crop.
From the sequencing data, ARS researchers have assembled a haplotype genetic map (mapping of alleles located closely together on the same chromosome that tend to be inherited together) that lays out portions of the genome shared by 27 diverse inbred lines of corn.
By reading the genetic map of a person, scientists will be able to pinpoint where the exact fault lies.
Map-based cloning requires that the target gene has a clear phenotype and that its position on the genetic map is known.