genetic effect

genetic effect

Genetics The result of exposure to substances–eg, radiation that cause damage to the genes of germinal cells–ie, sperm or egg. See Teratogenicity.
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where, [mu] is overall mean, Ai is the random additive genetic effect of ith animal, [YS.
For these traits, fitting a maternal additive genetic effect as well as maternal permanent environmental effect resulted in a significant increase in log likelihood ratio (p<0.
The genetic effect is much lower than those who are regular smokers, but this does not mean that there are no health consequences," said Crystal.
2006; Cobuci and Costa, 2012), however, evidences in favor of using lower order polynomials to model the additive genetic effect in comparison to the permanent environment effect have also been reported (Pool et al.
Hypertension can run in families but researchers are unsure how great the genetic effect is.
To date, the strongest genetic effect on the risk of myocardial infarction is associated with variants found on chromosome 9p21.
A pilot study comparing two groups of cancer patients found a genetic effect on cells that protects against disease and ageing.
Gene--environment interactions modeled latently have the advantage of providing information about the overall genetic effect averaged across the entire genome but tell nothing about the specific underlying biology.
Although the genetic effect on PTSD is small, the study's results give scientists a better grasp on how the sensitivity of long-term memories are affected by trauma.
published in the March 2011 American Journal of Psychiatry, found compelling evidence of the genetic effect in people taking ondansetron, a medication that has shown some promise in research regarding the treatment of severe alcohol dependence.
Nevertheless, the risk remains relatively small and most consanguineous marriages have no adverse genetic effect.
Furthermore the genetic effect of inbreeding, if any, would take around 400 to 500 years to surface, he asserted.