genetic defect


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ge·net·ic de·fect

(jĕ-netik dēfekt)
Any disease or disorder that is inherited.
References in periodicals archive ?
Nicknamed as "Hellboy" Schlitte's left arm is of normal size but a rare genetic defect makes his right forearm bone 33 per cent larger than his left, News.
The work by researchers at the Morgridge Institute for Research, the University of Wisconsin-Madison, the University of California and the WiCell Research Institute suggests that human induced pluripotent stem cells altered to correct a genetic defect may be cultured into subsequent generations of cells that remain free of the initial disease.
Scientists from the Dr von Haunersches Children's Hospital in Munich, found that children with a particular genetic defect were five times as likely to have asthma, five times as likely to wheeze and nine times as likely to have shortness of breath.
Dr Sadaf Farooqi, of Addenbrookes, said on radio: "It is an incontrovertible fact that a genetic defect was the cause of this child's problem.
Zhang indicated that, had the test shown any evidence of genetic defect, she would have aborted the baby.
My dream is to clone myself, repair my clone's genetic defect, and give him the opportunity to fulfill the potential that has been denied to me by a cruel quirk of nature.
The Danish scientists say that they are the first in the world to identify the genetic defect.
Since all routine methods of genetic analysis had failed to find the genetic defect in this region, we suspected the defect could be a rare DNA repeat expansion, so we specifically searched for one," says lead investigator Mariely DeJesus-Hernandez.
Washington, March 21 ( ANI ): Researchers have reported a defined genetic defect that causes a subset of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).
18 February 2011 - The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved yesterday Corifact, the first product intended to prevent bleeding in people with the rare genetic defect congenital Factor XIII deficiency.
He said it was more likely Matthew and Jason were hyper-sensitive due to an allergy, genetic defect, or a response to risk factors such as tobacco smoke.