periodontitis

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periodontitis

 [per″e-o-don-ti´tis]
inflammation of the periodontium, usually caused by specific pathologic bacteria that grow in the spaces between the gum and lower part of the tooth crown, and the host response to inflammation. If it continues unchecked the infection will spread to the bone in which the teeth are rooted. The bone then resorbs and the teeth slowly become detached from their supporting tissues. Periodontitis is the major cause of tooth loss after the age of 35. It can be prevented or controlled by good dental hygiene such as proper brushing and interdental cleaning, or by nonsurgical or surgical periodontal therapy. It is treated with local cleansing and débridement of the area, establishment of drainage for exudate, and use of antimicrobial agents. Antibiotic drugs and host modulating therapy are indicated if the symptoms are severe and unresponsive to other treatments. Extraction of the affected teeth may be necessary if the lesion is advanced.

per·i·o·don·ti·tis

(per'ē-ō-don-tī'tis),
1. Inflammation of the periodontium.
2. A chronic inflammatory disease of the periodontium occurring in response to bacterial plaque on the adjacent teeth; characterized by gingivitis, destruction of the alveolar bone and periodontal ligament, apical migration of the epithelial attachment resulting in the formation of periodontal pockets, and ultimately loosening and exfoliation of the teeth.
[periodontium + G. -itis, inflammation]

periodontitis

/peri·odon·ti·tis/ (-don-ti´tis) inflammatory reaction of the periodontium.

periodontitis

[per′ē·ō′dontī′tis]
inflammation of the periodontium caused by a complex reaction initiated when subgingival plaque bacteria are in close contact with the epithelium of the gingival sulcus. Injury arises from toxins and enzymes produced by the bacteria and from host-mediated defense responses. Apical movement of the junctional epithelium, which indicates attachment loss and alveolar bone loss, is diagnostic of periodontitis. See also periodontal disease.

periodontitis

Gum disease, pyorrhea gum disease Dentistry A condition caused by progression of gingivitis, with inflammation and infection of tooth ligaments and bones supporting teeth. See Juvenile periodontitis.

per·i·o·don·ti·tis

(perē-ō-don-tītis)
1. Inflammation of the periodontium.
2. A chronic inflammatory disease of the periodontium occurring in response to bacterial plaque on the adjacent teeth; characterized by gingivitis, destruction of the alveolar bone and periodontal ligament, apical migration of the epithelial attachment resulting in the formation of periodontal pockets, and, ultimately, loosening and exfoliation of the teeth.
[periodontium + G. -itis, inflammation]

periodontitis

Inflammation of the PERIODONTIUM. This may be centred mainly around the root of the tooth (apical periodontitis) or may be a persistent (chronic) condition affecting the whole periodontium as a complication of severe gum inflammation (gingivitis). Treatment of apical periodontitis is by drilling to drain any pus present and filling. Chronic periodontitis requires scrupulous attention to tooth hygiene, scaling, cleaning and sometimes removal of excessive gum tissue.

Periodontitis

A gum disease that destroys the structures supporting the teeth, including bone.
Mentioned in: Oral Hygiene, Toothache

periodontitis,

n an inflammatory disease that affects the periodontium within the oral cavity. Common symptoms include localized pain, erythema, swelling, loosening of teeth, and dental pockets. See also disease, periodontal.
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Periodontitis.

per·i·o·don·ti·tis

(perē-ō-don-tītis)
Inflammatory disease of periodontium occurring in response to bacterial plaque on adjacent teeth; characterized by gingivitis, destruction of alveolar bone and periodontal ligament, apical migration of the epithelial attachment resulting in formation of periodontal pockets, and ultimately loosening and exfoliation of teeth.
[periodontium + G. -itis, inflammation]

periodontitis (per´ēōdontī´tis),

n 1. the alterations occurring in the periodontium with inflammation. Gingival changes are those of gingivitis, with the clinical signs associated with gingivitis. It has histologic characteristics, such as ulceration of the sulcular and junctional epithelium, epithelial hyperplasia, proliferation of epithelial rete pegs into the gingival tissues, apical migration of the epithelial attachment after lysis of the gingival fibers, increased cellular and exudative infiltrate, and vascularity of the lamina propria. Resorption of bone in an apical direction results in the loss of attachment of the periodontal fibers to the bone. A transseptal band of reconstituted periodontal fibers (interdental) walls off the gingival inflammation from the underlying bone.
n 2. a chronic, progressive disease of the periodontium. Considered under the classification of periodontal disease.
periodontitis, acute,
n a sharply localized, acute inflammatory process involving the interproximal and marginal areas of two or more adjacent teeth, characterized by severe pain, purulent exudate from edematous inflamed gingivae, general malaise, fever, and sequestration of the crestal aspects of the alveolar process. It is now considered a stage of periodontal disease.
Enlarge picture
Periodontitis.
periodontitis, aggressive,
n a periodontal disease that manifests before age 35. It causes rapid loss of the periodontium and does not respond easily to periodontal treatment. Now juvenile, early-onset, and refractory forms of periodontitis are considered under this classification of periodontal disease. See also periodontitis, juvenile and periodontitis, early-onset (EOP).
periodontitis, chronic periapical,
n a periapical inflammation characterized by dental granuloma formation.
periodontitis, early-onset (EOP),
n a periodontal disease affecting children which, if left untreated, may cause premature tooth loss. Used to be considered
prepubertal periodontitis and is now considered under the classification of
aggressive periodontal disease.
periodontitis in children,
n See periodontitis, juvenile.
periodontitis, juvenile,
n a periodontal disease present in children or adolescents, with radiographic and clinical findings similar to those observed in the adult, including gingivitis, periodontal pocket formation, and bone resorption but only in specific areas
(localized) or throughout the oral cavity
(generalized). Used to be called
periodontosis, which is outdated, and now is considered under the classification of
aggressive periodontal disease.
periodontitis, marginal,
n the sequela to gingivitis in which the inflammatory process has spread apically to involve the alveolar process. It involves an inflammation of the marginal periodontium with resorption of the crest of alveolar bone. Apical migration of the epithelial attachment occurs with suprabony or infrabony pocket formation and cuplike resorptions and marginal translucence of the alveolar crest. In children the process may be more rapid and destructive than in adults. It is now considered a stage of periodontal disease.
periodontitis, refractory
n a type of aggressive periodontal disease that persists despite proper treatment and oral hygiene. Previously classified as a separate form of periodontitis, it is now generally not considered to be a separate form of the disease but simply normal periodontitis that is exacerbated by numerous factors in the patient's history and physiology. See also periodontitis.

periodontitis

inflammation of the periodontium. The condition is caused by residual food, bacteria and calcium deposits (tartar) that collect in the spaces between the gum and lower part of the tooth crown. If it continues unchecked the infection will spread to the bone in which the teeth are rooted. The bone then resorbs and the teeth are slowly detached from their supporting tissues. A common problem on some sheep farms causing premature loss of teeth and culling of the sheep. The specific cause is undetermined. Called also peridentitis. See also cara inchada.
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