generalization

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Related to generalizations: generalisation

generalization

 [jen″er-al-ĭ-za´shun]
the formation of a general principle or idea; inductive reasoning.
generalization of learning the application of previously learned concepts and behaviors to similar situations, a cognitive performance component of occupational therapy.

gen·er·al·i·za·tion

(jen'ĕr-ăl-i-zā'shŭn),
1. Rendering or becoming general, diffuse, or widespread, as when a primarily local disease becomes systemic.
2. The reasoning by which a basic conclusion is reached, which applies to different items, each having some common factor.

generalization

[jen′(ə)rəlīzā′shən]
Etymology: L, genus, kind; Gk, izein, to cause
1 the reasoning by which a basic conclusion is reached, with application to different items that have a common factor.
2 the process of reducing or subsuming under a general rule or statement, such as classifying items in general categories.
3 a principle with general application.
4 (in occupational therapy) the ability of a patient to apply knowledge and skills learned in therapy to a variety of similar but new situations.

gen·er·al·i·za·tion

(jen'ĕr-ăl-ī-zā'shŭn)
1. Rendering or becoming general, diffuse, or widespread, as when a primarily local disease becomes systemic.
2. The reasoning by which a basic conclusion is reached, which applies to different items, each having some common factor.
3. Categorization that obscures differences between people or situations (e.g., age categories).
Synonym(s): generalisation.

generalization

forming general propositions from particular cases or clinical signs.
References in periodicals archive ?
Generalization can be unfair in many ways in different areas: Just take the average opinion poll results concerning what people thought about Arkansans before Bill Clinton became US president -- an uneducated hillbilly image.
Our hypothesis is that analogical generalization can be used to generate meaningful clusters of hand-drawn sketches.
The idea of X-envelopes is the generalization of the concepts of divisible, pure, and neat subgroups discovered in different era.
Students' thinking processes in pattern generalization
Every major aspect of the Objectivist view of concepts--including their hierarchical nature, the role of similarities and differences in their formation, the role of quantitative relationships, and the role of integration within the total context--has a counterpart in the theory of inductive generalizations.
Third, under the assumption that linguistic structure is language-specific while substance is potentially universal, cross-linguistic generalizations are inevitably substance-based, and by virtue of this feature alone, they are distinct from grammatical phenomena as structural linguistic phenomena.
This generalization was also verified with more complicated statistical models.
For instance, when David Armstrong (1983) says that the laws of nature are neither generalizations nor regularities, but rather relations between universals, he is using "law" to mean something other than "lawlike" generalization or "nomic" regularity.
Understanding and using the analogies enables in-depth comprehension of phenomena, generalization of solutions, and transfer of knowledge from one domain to another.
My books are made from the tensions between high generalizations about East, West, humanity, the meaning of life, and damningly realistic observations about daily life.
Boomers have backed Bush, and his tax cuts, and his war (of course, we've also been against Bush, his tax cuts and his war--that just goes to show the poverty of making sweeping generalizations about generations.
Bill O'Reilly, who seems to love generalizations, thinks that liberals don't want people of faith (particularly evangelical Christians) on the Supreme Court.