generalization

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generalization

 [jen″er-al-ĭ-za´shun]
the formation of a general principle or idea; inductive reasoning.
generalization of learning the application of previously learned concepts and behaviors to similar situations, a cognitive performance component of occupational therapy.

gen·er·al·i·za·tion

(jen'ĕr-ăl-i-zā'shŭn),
1. Rendering or becoming general, diffuse, or widespread, as when a primarily local disease becomes systemic.
2. The reasoning by which a basic conclusion is reached, which applies to different items, each having some common factor.

generalization

[jen′(ə)rəlīzā′shən]
Etymology: L, genus, kind; Gk, izein, to cause
1 the reasoning by which a basic conclusion is reached, with application to different items that have a common factor.
2 the process of reducing or subsuming under a general rule or statement, such as classifying items in general categories.
3 a principle with general application.
4 (in occupational therapy) the ability of a patient to apply knowledge and skills learned in therapy to a variety of similar but new situations.

gen·er·al·i·za·tion

(jen'ĕr-ăl-ī-zā'shŭn)
1. Rendering or becoming general, diffuse, or widespread, as when a primarily local disease becomes systemic.
2. The reasoning by which a basic conclusion is reached, which applies to different items, each having some common factor.
3. Categorization that obscures differences between people or situations (e.g., age categories).
Synonym(s): generalisation.

generalization

forming general propositions from particular cases or clinical signs.
References in periodicals archive ?
The present author has also dealt with this issue, and his conclusions refute the essential component of Chomsky's argument with respect to these types of generalizations as well (see, e.
Grand theory is defined as a set of theories or generalizations that transcend the borders of disciplines to explain relationships among phenomena.
What we can still have, in short, are theoretical generalizations--broad claims that do more than assess individual cases, and do so, not just contingently (as when we point out that Dora is usually cruel to Jack), but as explanatory generalizations that seem to get at the nature of various moral considerations.
Baptists disagree about almost everything, and no generalization about even white Alabama Baptists, the focus of my study, fits all of them.
Determining the extent to which the government has an obligation to provide personnel and disciplinary information concerning officers who may testify is a complicated endeavor, not subject to simple generalizations and often raising sensitive privacy and professional issues.
The existential nature of the generalization keeps the lack of empirical evidence from falsifying the generalization.
But lifestyle differences such as abstention from alcohol may limit generalizations from the data, Wilson says.
The same problem arises with generalizations across inflectional microclasses.
Glib generalizations about working conditions, whether emerging from the European Commission or, for that matter, from Millbank Tower or from the Tory Central Office, can now be tested against a critical framework.
It then provides generalizations of the classical result of the Orlicz-Pettis theorem to delta multiplier convergent series with values in a locally convex space.
Empirical generalizations are rifles that consistently hold across multiple organizations and over time.
The assumption underlying much of the recent debate between "moral generalists" and "moral particularists" is that moral principles are (or would be) moral laws--by which I mean generalizations or some special class thereof, such as explanatory or counterfactual-supporting generalizations.