generalization

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generalization

 [jen″er-al-ĭ-za´shun]
the formation of a general principle or idea; inductive reasoning.
generalization of learning the application of previously learned concepts and behaviors to similar situations, a cognitive performance component of occupational therapy.

gen·er·al·i·za·tion

(jen'ĕr-ăl-i-zā'shŭn),
1. Rendering or becoming general, diffuse, or widespread, as when a primarily local disease becomes systemic.
2. The reasoning by which a basic conclusion is reached, which applies to different items, each having some common factor.

generalization

[jen′(ə)rəlīzā′shən]
Etymology: L, genus, kind; Gk, izein, to cause
1 the reasoning by which a basic conclusion is reached, with application to different items that have a common factor.
2 the process of reducing or subsuming under a general rule or statement, such as classifying items in general categories.
3 a principle with general application.
4 (in occupational therapy) the ability of a patient to apply knowledge and skills learned in therapy to a variety of similar but new situations.

gen·er·al·i·za·tion

(jen'ĕr-ăl-ī-zā'shŭn)
1. Rendering or becoming general, diffuse, or widespread, as when a primarily local disease becomes systemic.
2. The reasoning by which a basic conclusion is reached, which applies to different items, each having some common factor.
3. Categorization that obscures differences between people or situations (e.g., age categories).
Synonym(s): generalisation.

generalization

forming general propositions from particular cases or clinical signs.
References in periodicals archive ?
Consistently, they find interactions that involve school sector (Government, Catholic and Independent), indicating that generalisations made within one sector do not hold across other sectors.
Lee Cronbach (1975) wrote the only generalisation I have ever encountered in social science that I am confident will still stand unchallenged in a hundred years' time.
While this study, conducted within one faculty in one university, provides no strong basis for generalisation, it does test predictions made from theory in a specific context.
The teacher may then record the students' observations on the board and gradually a spelling generalisation can be arrived at.
Other words can then be added to the original lists of singular and plural nouns to test the generalisation suggested by students and exceptions searched for.
In such a process the students have still learnt an important spelling generalisation or 'rule' but have done so in a far more meaningful way, as they have come to the discovery themselves, rather than simply being told a 'rule' to remember.
Note that it is the case of different situations which leads to generalisations.
An academic in the early stage of his or her career may regard the growing emphasis on generalisations as an opportunity to replicate seminal studies and thus increase his/her research skills and hopefully, journal publications.
TABLE 1 An exercise in defining empirical generalisations Ways in which one can define Application to task at hand: that a concept is, defining empirical generalisations Lexical: A definition that The word "empirical", according reports how a term is generally to The Concise Macquarie used in some language.

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