generalization

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Related to generalisation: stimulus generalisation

generalization

 [jen″er-al-ĭ-za´shun]
the formation of a general principle or idea; inductive reasoning.
generalization of learning the application of previously learned concepts and behaviors to similar situations, a cognitive performance component of occupational therapy.

gen·er·al·i·za·tion

(jen'ĕr-ăl-i-zā'shŭn),
1. Rendering or becoming general, diffuse, or widespread, as when a primarily local disease becomes systemic.
2. The reasoning by which a basic conclusion is reached, which applies to different items, each having some common factor.

generalization

[jen′(ə)rəlīzā′shən]
Etymology: L, genus, kind; Gk, izein, to cause
1 the reasoning by which a basic conclusion is reached, with application to different items that have a common factor.
2 the process of reducing or subsuming under a general rule or statement, such as classifying items in general categories.
3 a principle with general application.
4 (in occupational therapy) the ability of a patient to apply knowledge and skills learned in therapy to a variety of similar but new situations.

gen·er·al·i·za·tion

(jen'ĕr-ăl-ī-zā'shŭn)
1. Rendering or becoming general, diffuse, or widespread, as when a primarily local disease becomes systemic.
2. The reasoning by which a basic conclusion is reached, which applies to different items, each having some common factor.
3. Categorization that obscures differences between people or situations (e.g., age categories).
Synonym(s): generalisation.

generalization

forming general propositions from particular cases or clinical signs.
References in periodicals archive ?
But in the long term the gap between research and practice may be closed if the academics can find out more about how practitioners form generalisations and can adapt their studies accordingly.
1997) is the elimination of small surface areas (such as building outlines, which is necessary in the process of generalisation as the map scale is reduced.
This is necessary since generalisation is an irreversible process, and the result achieved may not live up to expectations at all.
Pedagogical approaches to figural pattern generalisation
Generalisations decay over time, and they decay over distance.
In such a process the students have still learnt an important spelling generalisation or 'rule' but have done so in a far more meaningful way, as they have come to the discovery themselves, rather than simply being told a 'rule' to remember.
The stipulative definition (see Table 1) explicitly recognises that one should pay attention only to testable (hence falsifiable) propositions of the form "if A then C" in order to build empirical generalisations (Braithwaite, 1955; Skinner, 1953).
For all we presently know, the computational level may require some specification of the details of physical implementation and thereby consist of generalisations that fall within the latter theoretical framework.
But this is the way the BNP deals with people from African and Asian backgrounds by ridiculous lies and sweeping generalisations that are based not in fact but in the fears, ignorance and prejudice of the BNP themselves.
It's always dangerous to make generalisations but here's the thing with generalisations: they are called generalisations because - generally - they are true.
She said: "I understand people have interpreted my comments as making generalisations about white people.