generalize

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generalize

/gen·er·al·ize/ (-ĭz)
1. to spread throughout the body, as when local disease becomes systemic.
2. to form a general principle; to reason inductively.

generalize

(jĕn′ər-ə-līz′)
v. general·ized, general·izing, general·izes
v.tr.
1.
a. To reduce to a general form, class, or law.
b. To render indefinite or unspecific.
2.
a. To infer from many particulars.
b. To draw inferences or a general conclusion from.
v.intr.
1.
a. To form a concept inductively.
b. To form general notions or conclusions.
2. Medicine To spread through the body. Used of a usually localized disease.

gen′er·al·iz′a·ble adj.
gen′er·al·iz′er n.

generalize

(jen′ĕ-ră-līz″) [L. generalis]
1. To become or render nonspecific.
2. To become systemic, as a local disease.
generalizable (jen″ĕ-ră-lī′ză-bl), adjectivegeneralizability (jen″ĕ-ră-lī″ză-bil′ĭt-ē)
References in periodicals archive ?
The moderate sample size and relatively few withdrawals or patients lost to follow-up suggest that our findings are likely to be generalisable to the Australian population.
The use of statistical methods and everything that goes with these is a sign that one is a member of the 'dominant' group or paradigm, possessed of a positivist philosophy, a domineering disregard for other voices and viewpoints, and a preference for generalisable findings and 'universal laws'.
Also, the findings of this study needs to be validated in other vectorial systems before the study findings can be come generalisable and influence policy in other parts of the world.
As is common with the ideographic research method, no claim is made that conclusions are generalisable, beyond the responses from the women interviewed regarding their personal experiences pertaining to barriers constraining women's full participation in Indonesian public accounting.
The researchers caution that, because the analyses looked at hospital admissions in Swedish men aged 16 to 57, the results are not necessarily generalisable to other countries, to women or to older men.
The findings noted here may not be generalisable since the women in this study were notably more literate and employed as compared to a majority of rural population elsewhere.
The purpose of research is to generate or contribute to generalisable knowledge that could benefit present and future generations.
By helping students see generalisable relationships in their understanding of number and notation, they are able to move towards abstract and algebraic thinking (Radford, 2000).
Due to the convenience sample, the results may not be generalisable to a larger context.
As our study was conducted in Victoria, we do not claim that our results are generalisable to other Australian states.
First, OCBs tend to be more consistent than task performance across jobs, and thus the construct is more generalisable.
The problem is to devise a geopolitical strategy of inter-urban linkage that mitigates inter-urban competition and shifts political horizons away from the locality and into a more generalisable challenge to capitalist uneven development (Harvey 1989: 16)