generalize

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generalize

/gen·er·al·ize/ (-ĭz)
1. to spread throughout the body, as when local disease becomes systemic.
2. to form a general principle; to reason inductively.

generalize

(jĕn′ər-ə-līz′)
v. general·ized, general·izing, general·izes
v.tr.
1.
a. To reduce to a general form, class, or law.
b. To render indefinite or unspecific.
2.
a. To infer from many particulars.
b. To draw inferences or a general conclusion from.
v.intr.
1.
a. To form a concept inductively.
b. To form general notions or conclusions.
2. Medicine To spread through the body. Used of a usually localized disease.

gen′er·al·iz′a·ble adj.
gen′er·al·iz′er n.

generalize

(jen′ĕ-ră-līz″) [L. generalis]
1. To become or render nonspecific.
2. To become systemic, as a local disease.
generalizable (jen″ĕ-ră-lī′ză-bl), adjectivegeneralizability (jen″ĕ-ră-lī″ză-bil′ĭt-ē)
References in periodicals archive ?
Further, more extensive research, possibly utilising face-to-face, semi-structured interviews should be conducted using a larger, random sample to produce generalisable results (Biau et al.
The moderate sample size and relatively few withdrawals or patients lost to follow-up suggest that our findings are likely to be generalisable to the Australian population.
Most importantly, the observations from these clinics may not be generalisable to other treatment settings.
As such the results of the study do not seem generalisable to the country's population as a whole.
First, the participants were receiving tertiary care, thus the findings may not be generalisable to the entire substance abuse population, a significant proportion of whom might not be in treatment.
Although the study was limited in that a convenience sample was used, and hence the results may not be generalisable to a larger area of India, it highlights a need for formal social resources such as social workers and agencies, to support parents of children with conditions of disability outside of the family.
As this research is a case study, the findings are inevitably specific to the particular time and place (Yin, 2003); they are not generalisable to all classes.
The mathematical solution provides little insight into this particular form of reasoning however, a teacher might invite the class to explore the use of subtraction and the relative size of the terms in the ratios to determine whether the student's reasoning was plausible and generalisable.
However, these findings may not be generalisable to water infrastructure projects in other countries due to political, legal, economic and environmental differences.
Two previous studies showed that daily use of the combination was effective in both men and women but it was not certain how generalisable the data from those studies were to single women, women with multiple partners, or women who may not know whether their husband/partner has HIV.
The in house' issue comes through clearly: it is based on exceptional circumstances and is not generalisable since it is a tolerated exception when it is locally demonstrated.
While these limitations are important to note, the present study did not intend to provide generalisable findings but rather to investigate the link between insecure attachment and OCSB.