gene-splicing


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gene-splicing

n.
The process in which fragments of DNA from one or more different organisms are combined to form recombinant DNA and are made to function within the cells of a host organism.
References in periodicals archive ?
Forty years after the first gene-splicing experiments by biologists Paul Berg, Herbert Boyer, and Stanley Cohen, unregulated molecular biology experiments are common in high school science classes, and humanity is not yet afflicted with lab-made super-cancers.
Even though plant scientists are virtually unanimous that gene-splicing is an extension, or refinement, of earlier techniques and that it is far safer and more predictable than mutation breeding, only the former are subject to the kind of government approval that triggers the EIS obligation.
Still, their technological breakthroughs found ready application in the burgeoning gene-splicing industry.
A prototypic example is professional activist Jeremy Rifkin's relentless, decades-old antagonism toward recombinant DNA technology, or gene-splicing, applied to the production of innovative new drugs, gene therapy for life-threatening diseases, agriculture, or anything else.
They disregard the scientific consensus that gene-splicing is an extension or refinement of older, traditional techniques of genetic modification and that it does not warrant discriminatory, excessive regulation.
team used gene-splicing and cloning technologies to produce 12 cows which have no prions.
But that is tantamount to what the European Commission and parliament have decided to require for foods derived from organisms that have been genetically improved with the most precise gene-splicing techniques.
Then they dose what they hope is the gene-spliced product in antibiotics; if the food dies, that means that the gene-splicing did not take.
PHOTO (1--Color) Dave Crissman gives instructions to his 11th-grade science class at Valencia High School before they head to the lab to work on a gene-splicing experiment.
By contrast, the new gene-splicing technologies allow us to bypass all previous biological boundaries in nature, creating life forms that have never before existed.
Beta-thalassemia, a potentially life-threatening anemia, for instance, traces to inherited gene-splicing errors.
But only since the 1970s have advances in biotechnology (or gene-splicing to be more precise) upped the ante, with the promise of dramatically improved agricultural products -- and public resistance far out of synch with the potential risks.