gender role


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role

 [rōl]
a pattern of behavior developed in response to the demands or expectations of others; the pattern of responses to the persons with whom an individual interacts in a particular situation.
caregiver role the functions performed by a caregiver; see also under fatigue and strain.
gender role the public expression of gender; the image projected by a person that identifies their maleness or femaleness, which need not correspond to their gender identity.
impaired role the role played by a person who is disabled or chronically ill and who is experiencing a state of wellness and realization of potential commensurate with the condition. Unlike the sick person, the impaired person cannot be expected to “want to get well” but is expected to resume as much normal behavior as is possible.
sick role the role played by a person who has defined himself or herself as ill, with or without validation of the role by health care providers or family members. Adoption of the sick role changes the behavioral expectations of others toward sick persons. They are exempted from normal social responsibilities and not held responsible for the condition; they are obliged to “want to get well” and to seek competent medical help. The sick role also involves behavioral changes, including increased attention to the body and bodily functions, regression (increase in dependent behavior), narrowing of interests, and emotional overreactions.

gen·der role

the public presentation of gender identity; specifically, everything a person says and does that signals to others or to the self that one is male or female (or androgynous). See: sex role, gender identity.

gender role

the expression of a person's gender identity; the image that a person presents to both himself or herself and others, demonstrating maleness or femaleness.

gender role

Sexology The private experience of gender role–GR which is, in turn, the public manifestation of gender identity–GI–a person's individuality as ♂, ♀, or ambivalent, especially re self-awareness, behavior, sexuoerotic arousal & response

gen·der role

(jen'dĕr rōl)
The sex of a child assigned by a parent; when opposite to the child's anatomic sex (e.g., due to genital ambiguity at birth or to the parents' strong wish for a child of the opposite sex), the basis is formed for postpubertal dysfunctions.
See: sex role, sex reversal

gender role

All behaviour that conveys to others, consciously or otherwise, a person's GENDER IDENTITY as male or female.
References in periodicals archive ?
Masculine gender role conflict and male ideology in adolescent males: Correlates with psychological distress.
Women usually acquire a great deal of sex role learning or gender role identity, early in their lives leading to an attitude that creates difficulties later in working lives (Lipsey, Steiner, Purvis and Courant, 1990).
The BSRI (Bern, 1974) is a 60 item self-report instrument that measures gender role orientation.
Women traditional gender role was idealized in the 1950s, that of the child centered housewife.
Research also suggests that within-group variance is important to consider when exploring Christian women's gender role ideology.
Ten positive and ten genitive personality characteristics which were neither masculine nor feminine were selected for inclusion as items in the final Gender Role Inventory as social desirability items.
In model 2, we add parental traditional gender role attitude, parental attitude on girls' capability, and parental gender biased investment attitude.
That is, even among respondents who see the relevance of access to abortion to female equality, support for legal abortion among gender role egalitarians may be mitigated or superseded by other variables.
The current study, however, focused not only on the gender of an aggressor, but also the gender role of an aggressor.
Hypothesis 1: Level of family support of male flight attendants will differ among the four types of gender role so that androgynous will have the strongest positive correlation with family support, followed by feminine, masculine, then undifferentiated gender roles.
For men, the personal experience of GRC represents the negative consequences of conforming to, deviating from, or violating the gender role norms of masculinity ideology.