gender


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to gender: Gender roles

gender

 [jen´der]
sex (def. 1); see also gender identity and gender role.
gender identity disorder a disturbance of gender identification in which the affected person has an overwhelming desire to change their anatomic sex or insists that they are of the opposite sex, with persistent discomfort about their assigned sex or about filling its usual gender role; the disorder may become apparent in childhood or not appear until adolescence or adulthood. Individuals may attempt to live as members of the opposite sex and may seek hormonal and surgical treatment to bring their anatomy into conformity with their belief (see transsexualism). It is not the same as transvestism.

gen·der

(jen'dĕr),
Category to which an individual is assigned by self or others, on the basis of sex. Compare: sex, gender role.

gender

/gen·der/ (jen´der) sex; the category to which an individual is assigned on the basis of sex.

gender

(jĕn′dər)
n.
1. Grammar
a. A grammatical category, often designated as male, female, or neuter, used in the classification of nouns, pronouns, adjectives, and, in some languages, verbs that may be arbitrary or based on characteristics such as sex or animacy and that determines agreement with or selection of modifiers, referents, or grammatical forms.
b. The fact of being classified as belonging to such a category: agreement in gender, number, and case.
2.
a. Either of the two divisions, designated female and male, by which most organisms are classified on the basis of their reproductive organs and functions; sex.
b. One's identity as female or male or as neither entirely female nor entirely male.
c. Females or males considered as a group: Students lined up with the genders in different lines.
tr.v. gen·dered, gen·dering, gen·ders Archaic
To engender.

gen′der·less adj.

gender

[jen′dər]
Etymology: L, genus, kind
1 the classification of the sex of a person into male, female, or ambivalent.
2 the specific sex of a person. See also sex.

gender

The sex with which a person identifies him- or herself.

gender

Sex; one's personal, social, and legal status as ♂ or ♀, based on body and behavior, not on genital and/or erotic criteria. See Gender-identity/role.

gen·der

(jen'dĕr)
Category to which a person is assigned by self or others, on the basis of sex.
Compare: sex, gender role
[fr. L. genus, kind]

gender

A classification of organisms based on their sex. From the Latin genus , a kind.

gender

(1) in general use, synonym for biological sex; (2) the socially constructed views of feminine and masculine behaviour within individual cultural groups. gender identity a person's sense of their biological sex. gender role the set of behaviours, attitudes and other characteristics normally associated with masculinity and femininity within a given culture or social group; for example, certain sports are stereotypically viewed as reflecting a masculine role (e.g. basketball) whereas others reflect a feminine role (e.g. netball).

gender

anatomical sex of the individual

gender

sex; the category to which an individual is assigned on the basis of sex.

Patient discussion about gender

Q. In which month of pregnancy it's possible to determine gender of the fetus?

A. following marin's question - is there a difference when it comes to twins?

Q. Which gender is on the high risk of fibromyalgia and what may be the cause?

A. It’s generally found with women. Any women having family history of fibromyalgia is more likely to suffer from fibromyalgia. Causes are unknown. Factors known to cause are that some people with rheumatoid arthritis, lupus and spinal arthritis may be more likely to have fibromyalgia, too. Researchers suspect that some genes may stimulate pain in patients with fibromyalgia though there is no proof to that effect.

More discussions about gender
References in periodicals archive ?
Explaining religious differences in immigrants' gender role attitudes: The changing impact of origin country and individual religiosity.
The effect of priming gender roles on women's implicit gender beliefs and career aspirations.
Management and leadership may be socially established in masculine terms, making it hard for a female manager to harmonize between being perceived as a proficient organizer and as adequately feminine not to be seen as rejecting gender requirements.
Gender mainstreaming in particular demands women in the legislative body, the progress of the particular gender arrangement in administration, as well as gender proficiency in social civilization from universities to workers' organizations (Walby, 2005).
The selection of the Rwandan case may be understood from the perspective of previous research on gender and aid effectiveness which has hinted at the importance of a recipient country's own commitment to gender-related objectives for the integration of a gender dimension in development interventions (see e.
Her Highness said that the UAE leaderships continuous support for enhancing gender balance, along with the success of the Gender Balance Index, which was received positively by government entities, motivates the UAE Gender Balance Council to strengthen its efforts to achieve its goals of narrowing the gender gap across all sectors and implementing the directives of HH Sheikh Mohammed to establish the UAE as a leader in international gender balance indicators.
Asuelimen Felicia Eyebe, Special Assistant, Gender from Esan South East
Chaired by Mona Al Marri, Vice President of the UAE Gender Balance Council, the second Global Gender Circle was attended by 15 IMF experts and consultants.
Bigender: Having two gender identities, which maybe experienced simultaneously or at separate times.
Among the many concerns surrounding same-sex couples, some have suggested that children raised by same-sex parents may not learn socially appropriate gender roles," the authors wrote.
It assumes that it is better not to actively transition a child socially but to remain neutral to the way in which the child expresses gender identity.
Most parents enter into parenthood with some basic assumptions: their child is going to be cisgender (their gender identity "matches" their birth sex), gender conforming (their interests and expressions are in line with what most expect from their birth gender), and heterosexual.